Questo sito o gli strumenti terzi da questo utilizzati si avvalgono di cookie necessari al funzionamento ed utili alle finalità illustrate nella cookie policy. Se vuoi saperne di più o negare il consenso a tutti o ad alcuni cookie visita questo link. Chiudendo questo banner, scorrendo questa pagina, cliccando su un link o proseguendo la navigazione in altra maniera, acconsenti all'uso dei cookie. X

NEWS

23
02
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Burberry Wins Preliminary Injunction Against Baneberry at Suzhou, China’s Intermediate People’s Court for Trademark Infringement:
  • https://www.natlawreview.com/article/burberry-wins-preliminary-injunction-against-baneberry-suzhou-china-s-intermediate;

 

  1. As LVMH’s Bernard Arnault Looks to SPACs, What are the Key Legal Issues at Play?:
  • https://www.thefashionlaw.com/as-lvmhs-bernard-arnault-looks-to-spacs-what-are-the-key-legal-issues-at-play/;

 

  1. Protecting Designs: Considerations for the Fashion Industry Post-Brexit:

https://www.thefashionlaw.com/protecting-designs-considerations-for-the-fashion-industry-post-brexit/;   

 

  1. Here we draw again: the never-ending debate around street art and its removal:

 

  1. Five considerations for the transposition and application of Article 17 of the DSM Directive:
  • https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2021/02/five-considerations-for-transposition.html;

 

  1. Pharma firm loses patent suit to stop generic HIV drug:

 

  1. Europe hints at patent grab from Big Pharma:
  • https://www.politico.eu/article/europe-patent-grab-big-pharma/;

 

  1. PNC Sues Plaid Over Alleged Trademark Infringement:
  • https://www.pymnts.com/innovation/2021/remote-work-hasnt-stopped-bank-of-america-inventors-from-filing-record-patents/;

 

  1. Teledentistry.com Partners with UNLV to Provide Patent-Pending Model of Uberized Teledentistry Services:

 

  1. Chanel is Suing an Accessories Company Over Jewelry Made from Authentic Logo-Bearing Buttons;
  • https://www.thefashionlaw.com/chanel-is-suing-shriver-duke-over-jewelry-made-from-authentic-logo-bearing-buttons/.

 

MORE

16
02
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Aquariums or Phone booths or Both?

https://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=c39cf898-e2d3-410e-a483-13b7825ea63d

 

  1. Models-as-authors: copyright ownership in fashion campaigns, which, due to the pandemic, are increasingly being shot through FaceTime

https://www.thefashionlaw.com/as-givenchy-campaign-stars-style-themselves-the-issue-of-authorship-and-ownership-abounds/

 

  1. Joint EPO-EUIPO report shows benefits of owning IP rights (especially if you are an SME)

https://www.epo.org/service-support/publications.html?pubid=225#tab3

 

  1. World Intellectual Property Day (April 26, 2021) devoted to IP & SMEs: Taking your ideas to market

https://www.wipo.int/ip-outreach/en/ipday/

 

  1. How To Reduce Brexit-Related Counterfeiting Risk

https://www.trademarknow.com/blog/how-to-reduce-brexit-related-counterfeiting-risk

 

  1. Revolution is coming. With billions of devices connected to the internet, this ‘megatrend’ could re-shape IP forever

https://www.intellectualpropertymagazine.com/patent/revolution-is-coming-145409.htm?origin=internalSearch

 

  1. The Trademark: A Saleable, Robust and Surprisingly Flexible Asset
    https://www.thefashionlaw.com/the-trademark-a-saleable-robust-and-surprisingly-flexible-asset/

 

  1. Trade secrets: the ‘alternative IP’
    https://www.worldipreview.com/news/trade-secrets-benefits-of-the-alternative-ip-21031

 

  1. INTA announces 2021 Annual Meeting date, with hybrid event in Houston planned

https://www.inta.org/inta-announces-2021-annual-meeting-other-events/

 

  1. IPERICO 2020, i numeri del contrasto alla contraffazione in Italia

https://uibm.mise.gov.it/index.php/it/iperico-2020-i-numeri-del-contrasto-alla-contraffazione-in-italia

MORE

08
02
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. U.S. Customs Seized $1.3 Billion in Counterfeit Goods in 2020 – From COVID Kits to Dior Jordans
  • https://www.thefashionlaw.com/u-s-customs-seized-1-3-billion-in-counterfeit-goods-in-2020-from-covid-kits-to-dior-jordans/
  1. The 'goldfish phone booth' copyright case in Japan
  1. Minori sui social: il Garante privacy apre fascicolo su Facebook e Instagram. La verifica sarà estesa anche agli altri social
  • https://www.garanteprivacy.it/web/guest/home/docweb/-/docweb-display/docweb/9527301
  1. Trademark leaders expect increased consumer engagement with brands, creating an anti-counterfeiting opportunity
  1. Red Bull marks well known for sporting events
  1. The Museum of the Bible Must Once Again Return Artifacts, This Time an Entire Warehouse of 5,000 Egyptian Objects
  1. WeWoreWhat, Danielle Bernstein Want Infringement Suit Over “Copycat” Print Tossed Out of Court
  1. Olaplex, L’Oréal lose Fed Circuit appeals over haircare patent
  1. One-third of brands reported cyber IP attacks in 2020: report
  1. Amazon wins territorial trademark case at IPEC

 

 

MORE

29
01
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Ericsson launches fresh patent suit at Samsung

 

  1. Minaj-Chapman Copyright Settlement is a Warning to Artists

 

  1. Cypriot cheesemakers lose ‘BBQloumi’ dispute at EU court

 

  1. MLS, Beckham’s Miami Lose ‘Inter’ Name Trademark Ruling to Milan

See the full decision here: https://ttabvue.uspto.gov/ttabvue/v?pno=91247160&pty=OPP&eno=25

 

  1. National Advertising Division Says Pre-Launch Investor Presentation Can Be Challenged Under Advertising Law

 

  1. INTA Files Amicus on Genuine Use of Collective Marks in EU

 

  1. Corbyn project aims to tackle IP rights covering Covid vaccines

 

  1. Protecting “The Chokwe Thinker”

 

  1. Licence Compatibility Checker: EC's Joinup Platform Introduces New Tool

 

  1. Print journalism under siege: podcasts to the rescue?
  • https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2021/01/print-journalism-under-siege-podcasts.html

 

 

MORE

18
01
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1.  Unsung Florence Foster Jenkins screenwriter is entitled to joint authorship share.  

 

  1.  Graffiti artist says North Face copied his design.

 

  1.  Amazon under the spotlight in latest ‘Notorious Markets’ report

 

  1.  Nazi Aryanisation of intellectual property - and contemporary efforts to restore it.

 

  1.  British Airways facing potential £800m data breach suit.

 

  1.  Jimi Hendrix family dispute escalates over use of name for music school.
  • https://www.theguardian.com/music/2021/jan/13/jimi-hendrix-family-dispute-escalates-over-use-of-name-for-music-school.

 

  1. Unicolors is Seeking Supreme Court Intervention in Copyright Case Against H&M.

 

  1.  BGH ‘Cigarette package’: Extension of undisclosed features in EU patent.

 

  1.  As Fashion Embraces ESG, There Are Some Critical Legal Issues at Play.

 

  1.  UKIPO declines to register Huawei’s ‘Mind Studio’ trademark
MORE

13
01
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Two copyright infringement cases: over a stylish woman silhouette and regarding Software code: http://www.iprhelpdesk.eu/blog/ip-news-30;
  2. Intellectual property after 1 January 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/intellectual-property-after-1-january-2021#history;
  3. 'ATHLON CUSTOM SPORTSWEAR’ found not confusingly similar to ‘DECATHLON’: https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2021/01/athlon-custom-sportswear-found-not.html;
  4. WhatsApp amends Privacy Policy to facilitate Third Party User Data access, Parliamentary Committee proposes changes to the Draft Data Protection Bill and more: https://www.bananaip.com/ip-news-center/whatsapp-amends-privacy-policy-to-facilitate-third-party-user-data-access-parliamentary-committee-proposes-changes-to-the-draft-data-protection-bill-and-more/;
  5. Boards of Appeal are competent to overturn a finding of fact at first instance (T 1604/16): https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2021/01/boards-of-appeal-are-competent-to.html;
  6. Netflix sued by Author for Copyright Infringement, Nicki Minaj sued for Copyright Infringement and more: https://www.bananaip.com/ip-news-center/netflix-sued-by-author-for-copyright-infringement-nicki-minaj-sued-for-copyright-infringement-and-more/;
  7. Chile and the Madrid Protocol: are we close yet? https://iptango.blogspot.com/2021/01/chile-and-madrid-protocol-are-we-close.html;
  8. Michael Jordan Wins Trademark Dispute In China: https://www.asiaiplaw.com/section/news-analysis/michael-jordan-wins-trademark-dispute-in-china;
MORE

05
01
21

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Pierre Cardin Leaves Behind a Legacy – and a Lesson – in Fashion Licensing:

 

  1. Hermès Prevails in Japanese Case Over Birkin Lookalikes, as Court Points to Resale Market as Key Factor:

 

  1. Swedish Patent and Market Court of Appeal cancels Crocs three-dimensional trade mark:

 

  1. A performance review: is copyright doing its job in the music industry?:

 

  1. Lipocine Announces Update on Jury Trial in Patent Infringement Lawsuit Against Clarus Therapeutics:

 

  1. IBM and Airbnb reach settlement in patent lawsuit:

 

  1. Sony patent filing shows head acoustic biometrics, Apple granted patent for multi-user authentication:

 

  1. PNC Sues Plaid Over Alleged Trademark Infringement:

 

  1. WWE Files Applications For Six New Trademarks:

 

  1. Bandai Namco takes page from Sony to leverage intellectual property:

 

MORE

05
01
21

L'ambito di tutela delle DOP registrate alla luce della recente pronuncia della CGUE (CAUSA: C-490/19)

di Riccardo Caggia

 

Nella sentenza recentemente emessa all’esito della causa C-490/19 la Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea (CGUE) ha avuto modo di pronunciarsi con riferimento all’ambito di tutela delle Denominazioni di Origine Protetta (DOP). Per il tramite della pronuncia citata, la CGUE ha chiarito come un prodotto che richiami determinate caratteristiche tipiche di un altro prodotto a marchio DOP sia in violazione dei diritti conferiti dalla Denominazione di Origine Protetta, così estendendone il relativo ambito di tutela.  

 

La sentenza in esame rappresenta l’epilogo di un procedimento che prende le mosse dal rinvio operato dalla Cour de Cassation francese (Giudice del rinvio) nell’ambito di una controversia giudiziaria iniziata dal Syndacat Interprofessionel de défense du fromage Morbier (Syndacat) nei confronti della Societé Fromagere du Livradois Sas. Il Syndacat, in particolare, contestava una concorrenza sleale e parassitaria da parte della Societé Fromagere du Livradois Sas, avendo quest’ultima commercializzato un proprio formaggio con caratteristiche estetiche tipiche del “Morbier” (i.e. apponendo la tipica striscia nera orizzontale cingente l’intera forma di tale tipo di formaggio). 

 

La CGUE si è, quindi, dovuta interrogare sull’interpretazione tanto dell’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, del Regolamento n. 510/2006 del Consiglio del 20 marzo 2006, relativo alla protezione delle indicazioni geografiche e delle denominazioni d’origine dei prodotti agricoli e alimentari, quanto dell’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, del Regolamento n. 1151/2012 del Parlamento Europeo e del Consiglio. La questione principale verteva, nello specifico, sullo stabilire se le norme citate dovessero essere interpretate nel senso di vietare l’uso, da parte di un terzo, di una denominazione registrata e se, più in particolare, tale eventuale divieto dovesse riguardare anche la riproduzione della forma o dell’aspetto che caratterizzano un prodotto oggetto di una denominazione registrata.

 

Ebbene, in una pronuncia dal carattere certamente innovativo, la Corte UE ha ritenuto di dover interpretare le norme in esame in un senso particolarmente estensivo, giungendo – quindi – a disporre il divieto di riproduzione anche delle caratteristiche estetiche dei prodotti protetti da DOP registrate ed enunciando, al contempo, i seguenti principi di diritto:

 

  1. L’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, del regolamento (CE) n. 510/2006 del Consiglio, del 20 marzo 2006, relativo alla protezione delle indicazioni geografiche e delle denominazioni d’origine dei prodotti agricoli e alimentari, e l’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, del regolamento (UE) n. 1151/2012 del Parlamento europeo e del Consiglio, del 21 novembre 2012, sui regimi di qualità dei prodotti agricoli e alimentari, devono essere interpretati nel senso che essi non vietano solo l’uso, da parte di un terzo, della denominazione registrata”;

 

  1. “L’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, lettera d), del regolamento n. 510/2006 e l’articolo 13, paragrafo 1, lettera d), del regolamento n. 1151/2012 devono essere interpretati nel senso che essi vietano la riproduzione della forma o dell’aspetto che caratterizzano un prodotto oggetto di una denominazione registrata, qualora questa riproduzione possa indurre il consumatore a credere che il prodotto di cui trattasi sia oggetto di tale denominazione registrata. Occorre valutare se detta riproduzione possa indurre in errore il consumatore europeo, normalmente informato e ragionevolmente attento e avveduto, tenendo conto di tutti i fattori rilevanti nel caso di specie”.

 

La sentenza in esame si colloca, evidentemente, in una prospettiva di ampliamento dell’ambito di tutela conferito dalle Denominazioni di Origine Protetta, circostanza che – senza dubbio – risulterà particolarmente favorevole per tutti i titolari di tali diritti e, quindi, per la protezione – tra le altre cose – delle specialità agroalimentari. Sotto tale prospettiva, la decisione della CGUE merita apprezzamento, in quanto rende possibile intervenire nei confronti di condotte di concorrenza sleale e parassitaria particolarmente insidiose, ovverosia tutte quelle condotte che – mediante tentativi di decezione dei consumatori fondati sul richiamo dell’aspetto di prodotti DOP – pongano un serio rischio di diluire il prestigio e l’apprezzamento del mercato di cui godono prodotti caratterizzati da elevati standard di qualità come, per l’appunto, i prodotti a marchio DOP.

MORE

28
12
20

Shiseido v. Amazon: i sistemi di distribuzione selettiva e le vendite online

di Giulia Pezzera

 

Il tema della distribuzione selettiva ha assunto un ruolo centrale nella tutela dei marchi, con particolare riferimento ai marchi di lusso.

 

È evidente che la reputazione di un marchio si manifesti anche tramite i canali di distribuzione utilizzati. Di conseguenza, i titolari dei marchi adottano sistemi di distribuzione che consentono di limitare la commercializzazione dei propri prodotti esclusivamente a quei rivenditori che siano stati preventivamente ammessi alla rete distributiva.

 

Tali sistemi, tuttavia, rischiano di pregiudicare la libera concorrenza. Da un lato, infatti, pongono degli ostacoli all’accesso al mercato ad alcune categorie di rivenditori, dall’altro limitano il bacino di clientela per i distributori ammessi al network autorizzato, che potranno rivendere i prodotti esclusivamente ai consumatori finali o agli altri appartenenti alla rete distributiva. Si è dunque reso necessario un contemperamento delle diverse esigenze, che ha condotto la giurisprudenza europea a subordinare la liceità dei sistemi di distribuzione selettiva ad alcuni requisiti, definiti “criteri Metro”, dal nome della società protagonista di una delle prime vicende oggetto di pronuncia pregiudiziale della Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea in argomento (CGUE 25-10-1977, Metro SB-Großmärkte GmbH & Co. KG contro Commissione delle Comunità europee, Causa 26/76). Secondo tali requisiti, i sistemi di distribuzione selettiva non ricadono nell’ambito dei divieti derivanti dall’art. 101 del Trattato sul Funzionamento dell’Unione Europea (TFUE) qualora siano giustificati dalla natura dei prodotti oggetto di vendita (in particolare i prodotti di lusso o di alta tecnologia), siano adottati criteri di accesso oggettivi ed applicati in modo non discriminatorio e, al contempo, sia garantita la proporzionalità rispetto agli obiettivi perseguiti, adottando restrizioni che non vadano oltre il limite del necessario.

 

La violazione di un sistema di distribuzione selettiva è in grado di integrare uno dei “motivi legittimi” previsti all’art. 5 comma 2 c.p.i., che costituiscono una deroga al verificarsi dell’esaurimento del marchio, qualora tale violazione determini un danno al prestigio del marchio stesso. Ne consegue che il titolare potrà opporsi alla commercializzazione dei prodotti anche a seguito dell’immissione in commercio all’interno del territorio dell’Unione Europea.

 

In giurisprudenza si ritiene, in particolare, che tale pregiudizio si verifichi, ad esempio, qualora il distributore terzo non sia dotato di locali ritenuti adeguati, quando i prodotti recanti il marchio cui ci si riferisce siano esposti insieme a prodotti di diversa natura e di minor valore economico o qualora non siano garantiti adeguati servizi di assistenza pre e post vendita.

 

Tale impostazione, formatasi in relazione ai punti vendita tradizionali, può essere calata anche nell’ambito della vendita online, mantenendo le medesime finalità, ma assumendo – com’è ovvio – connotazioni diverse, dettate dalla particolarità di questo tipo di commercio.

 

È noto infatti che la vendita online ha assunto, in questo periodo storico, un ruolo fondamentale, rafforzato dalla presente situazione pandemica, durante la quale l’utilizzo dei servizi di e-commerce è notevolmente aumentato.  

 

Su tali questioni si è recentemente pronunciato, con ordinanza del 19 ottobre 2020, il Tribunale di Milano, nell’ambito del procedimento cautelare instaurato da Beauté Prestige International S.A., Shiseido Europe S.A. e Shiseido Italy S.p.A. (“Shiseido”) nei confronti di Amazon Europe Core S.a.r.l., Amazon EU S.a.r.l. e Amazon Services Europe S.a.r.l (“Amazon”).

 

Le ricorrenti, licenziatarie esclusive dei marchi “Narciso Rodriguez”, “Issey Miyake”, “Elie Saab”, “Dolce e Gabbana” e “Zadig & Voltaire”, hanno proposto procedimento urgente ante causam nei confronti di Amazon “per l’indebita promozione e offerta in vendita dei prodotti recanti i marchi di titolarità delle ricorrenti attraverso l’omonima piattaforma di e-commerce”. Le resistenti, che – si precisa – sono estranee al sistema di distribuzione selettiva adottato da Shiseido, non garantirebbero, secondo le ricorrenti, il rispetto dei requisiti necessari a salvaguardare il prestigio dei propri marchi, con conseguente danno alla relativa reputazione e notorietà.

 

Il Tribunale ha, anzitutto, richiamato la giurisprudenza comunitaria in tema di esaurimento del marchio e di sistemi di distribuzione selettiva, conformandosi a tali orientamenti. Dopodiché, l’attenzione è stata posta sul tema delle vendite online, confermando (anche in questo caso in linea con quanto già affermato dalla giurisprudenza europea) che, se da un lato sarebbe illegittimo un divieto assoluto alle vendite online (considerato una grave restrizione della concorrenza), dall’altro lato è lecito esigere il rispetto di alcuni standard qualitativi da parte del sito ove le vendite online sono poste in essere.

 

Si è, quindi, reso necessario valutare la questione sulla base di tre principali interrogativi: i) se i prodotti oggetto di lite potessero essere considerati articoli di lusso; ii) se il titolare dei marchi avesse predisposto un sistema di distribuzione selettiva valido; iii) se la vendita dei prodotti effettuata da Amazon tramite le proprie piattaforme potesse, effettivamente, arrecare un danno alla reputazione dei marchi.

 

Per quanto riguarda il primo aspetto, l’aura di prodotti di lusso è stata riconosciuta solamente nei confronti dei marchi “Narciso Rodriguez” e “Dolce e Gabbana”, facendo leva su alcuni indici tra cui la ricerca di materiali di alta qualità, la cura nel packaging, la presentazione al pubblico, l’accreditamento nel settore di riferimento ed il consolidato riconoscimento da parte della stampa specialistica. La valutazione successiva si è, quindi, limitata a questi due marchi.

 

Relativamente al secondo punto, il sistema di distribuzione selettiva di Shiseido è stato considerato adeguato a creare e mantenere un’immagine di lusso associata ai prodotti, sia per quanto riguarda i negozi “fisici” facenti parte del network distributivo, sia per quanto riguarda le vendite via Internet. Le ricorrenti, infatti, subordinano contrattualmente la possibilità di vendere i propri prodotti online ad una preventiva autorizzazione, che viene riconosciuta tenendo conto di alcuni criteri, in particolare la qualità grafica del sito, la predisposizione di una “zona di qualità dedicata”, la presenza di spazi dedicati ai prodotti di lusso e l’assenza di offerte in vendita di prodotti di diversa natura rispetto a quelli di profumeria e cosmetica.

 

Infine, per quanto riguarda il terzo punto, il Tribunale ha ritenuto che, in effetti, la vendita effettuata tramite Amazon leda gravemente il prestigio dei marchi “Narciso Rodriguez” e “Dolce e Gabbana”, accogliendo le doglianze avanzate dalle ricorrenti, a causa i) dell’assenza di negozi fisici che precluderebbe un idoneo servizio clienti in grado di informare il pubblico in modo adeguato; ii) dell’accostamento a prodotti eterogenei e di livello qualitativo non elevato; iii) della presenza di prodotti di altri brands, anche appartenenti a segmenti di mercato qualitativamente più bassi.

 

Il Tribunale ha quindi accolto – parzialmente – il ricorso, limitatamente ai marchi “Narciso Rodriguez” e “Dolce e Gabbana”, che, sulla base delle produzioni documentali, sono stati effettivamente ritenuti marchi di lusso, tali da subire un notevole danno al proprio prestigio a causa della vendita effettuata tramite Amazon.

 

Va peraltro specificato che, al fine di poter giungere a tali conclusioni, si è reso necessario considerare anche il ruolo attivamente svolto dalle resistenti. Infatti, la recente sentenza della Corte di Giustizia (Coty v. Amazon, C-576/18), ha escluso che gli operatori che si occupino della semplice attività di stoccaggio di prodotti che violano i diritti connessi ad un marchio siano responsabili di tale lesione. Il Tribunale – dopo aver specificato che la distinzione tra hosting provider attivo e passivo sia rilevante solo da un punto di vista risarcitorio e, dunque, non in sede cautelare – ha specificato che, nel caso concreto, non sembrerebbe che Amazon abbia rivestito un ruolo meramente passivo, considerato che i) ha talvolta operato quale venditore diretto dei prodotti oggetto di lite e ii) ha svolto un ruolo attivo quanto ai servizi di intermediazione (gestione dello stoccaggio, spedizione dei prodotti, gestione del servizio clienti, dell’attività promozionale). Tale ruolo, inoltre, è stato ritenuto in grado di determinare nei consumatori la convinzione dell’esistenza di un legame tra Amazon e Shiseido.

 

Tutto quanto sopra considerato, i giudici hanno quindi ritenuto che Amazon abbia svolto, nel caso di specie, il ruolo di hosting provider attivo, con la conseguenza che non possa essere esonerata dalla responsabilità di cui all’art. 16 del d.lgs. 70/2003, ossia – appunto – dalla responsabilità gravante su chi svolga attività di hosting.

MORE

28
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. More Iconic (and Patented) Toys and Games: A 2020 Update
  1. How the 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic Changed IP Practice
  1. The Top Five European Patent Developments of 2020
  1. ABG Drops Counterfeiting Claim in Case Over New Balance’s “Vision” Sneakers
  1. 5 Years After its Parent Company Sued Alibaba – Twice, Gucci Launches on Chinese E-Commerce Platform
  1. Rihanna in copyright spat over Fenty Instagram ad
  1. Netflix settles copyright spat over Sherlock Holmes’ emotions
  1. Operazione “Bologna luxury”
  1. La frode delle mascherine Armani e Gucci nate contraffatte nelle sartorie illegali
  1. When a strong reputation does not guarantee distinctiveness
MORE

21
12
20

IP assets to foster sustainable business models in the fashion industry

MORE

21
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

MORE

14
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. In a Blow to Experience-Art Emporium Meow Wolf, a Judge Allows an Artist’s Copyright Lawsuit to Proceed
  1. Se Gio Ponti finisce su una tovaglia
  1. 14th edition of the ICC Intellectual Property Roadmap Published
  1. EPO Study: Innovation in Smart Connected Objects on the Rise
  1. Patents and royalties battle with Samsung hits Ericsson shares
  1. Apple is sued by rival over alleged App Store monopoly
  1. EUIPO-KIPO Exchange on new technologies and AI
  1. Chappelle's Show on Netflix - the unforgiving tension between an artist and the creations he does not own
  1. Angry Birds vs Angry Chicken: Trademark Case Filed With USPTO
  1. Nike and Warren Lotas Settle Trademark Suit Over “Illegal Fake” Sneakers

 

 

MORE

14
12
20

L’EUIPO e i criteri valutativi del carattere distintivo dei marchi sonori – Caso R 2821/2019-1

di Livia Allegri

 

Accanto ai cosiddetti marchi “tradizionali”, comunemente rappresentati da segni grafici o verbali, è possibile registrare anche segni costituiti esclusivamente da un suono. In questo caso si parla di marchi “sonori”, appartenenti alla categoria dei cosiddetti “marchi invisibili”, ossia di tutti quei marchi che non possono essere percepiti visivamente.

 

Sotto il profilo giuridico, anche i marchi sonori, come qualsiasi altro tipo di marchio, per essere registrabili devono possedere, ai sensi dell’articolo 7 (1)(b) Regolamento sul marchio dell'Unione europea (RMUE), il requisito della capacità distintiva: devono, cioè, essere costituiti da segni idonei ad identificare e distinguere un prodotto o un servizio come provenienti da una determinata impresa (anziché da un’altra).

 

Con una recente decisione, la Commissione di Ricorso dell’Ufficio Europeo per la Proprietà Intellettuale (EUIPO) si è pronunciata proprio in materia di marchi sonori, offrendo un’approfondita analisi sui relativi criteri di valutazione del carattere distintivo.

 

La decisione in esame rappresenta l’epilogo del ricorso promosso dalla società tedesca B. Braun Melsungen AG avverso il rifiuto opposto dall’EUIPO nei confronti della domanda di marchio n. 18063460 presentata dalla stessa società nel 2019 per il suono di cui al seguente link http://euipo.europa.eu/trademark/sound/EM500000018063460, del quale era stata richiesta tutela in relazione a prodotti e servizi nei settori dei dispositivi medicali, dei software e dell’elettronica.

 

Tale domanda di marchio è stata contestata dall’EUIPO per mancanza di carattere distintivo con riferimento ai prodotti ed ai servizi rivendicati nelle classi 9, 10, 11, 41 e 44. In buona sostanza, le ragioni che hanno determinato il rifiuto da parte dell’esaminatore dell’Ufficio europeo sono state i) un’asserita incapacità della sequenza sonora di fornire al pubblico di riferimento indicazioni sull’origine dei prodotti e dei servizi protetti dalla registrazione, in quanto già comunemente utilizzata nel campo degli apparecchi elettronici; ii) un’asserita incapacità di generare alcuna forma di riconoscimento, in quanto il suono oggetto della domanda di marchio sarebbe eccessivamente semplice e banale.

 

Interrogata sulla questione dopo la presentazione del relativo appello, la Commissione di Ricorso dell’EUIPO ha, innanzitutto, ricordato che il Regolamento sul marchio dell'Unione europea (RMUE) non stabilisce alcun criterio particolare per la valutazione del carattere distintivo di un marchio sonoro o, in generale, di altri impedimenti alla registrazione di tali marchi. In secondo luogo, la Commissione di Ricorso ha precisato che il solo fattore decisivo ai fini del riconoscimento del suddetto carattere distintivo, in materia di marchi sonori, è costituito dalla capacità della sequenza sonora di permettere al consumatore di riconoscere i prodotti ed i servizi come provenienti da una particolare impresa (anziché da un’altra). Nel caso specifico, si è ritenuto che i prodotti ed i servizi rivendicati dalla domanda di marchio UE rifiutata siano destinati a consumatori medi ed a consumatori esperti, in particolare nei settori IT, salute e preparazioni mediche o sanitarie e, dunque, ad un pubblico dotato di un elevato livello di attenzione.

 

Partendo da tali considerazioni, la Commissione di Ricorso ha altresì stabilito che la sequenza sonora in questione sia breve e memorabile (un cosiddetto “Jingle”)” e, soprattutto, “non troppo breve per essere percepita come un segno di riconoscimento”.

La Commissione ha, inoltre, evidenziato che il fatto che molti dispositivi elettronici producano una sequenza sonora quando vengono attivati dimostra che i consumatori sono abituati a percepire tali suoni come un’indicazione dell’origine del prodotto, a condizione che la sequenza sonora sia memorabile.

Pertanto, il suono per il quale è stata richiesta la registrazione come marchio dell’Unione Europea, secondo la decisione in esame, rappresenta un jingle ritmico di quattro suoni, idoneo – in quanto tale – ad essere memorizzato dai consumatori di riferimento e, quindi, adatto ad identificare i prodotti ed i servizi della B. Braun Melsungen sul mercato.

Alla luce del ragionamento sopra esposto, la Commissione di Ricorso ha avuto modo di ribadire che i requisiti per la registrazione dei marchi sonori devono essere valutati con i medesimi criteri applicati alle altre tipologie di marchio ed ha, dunque, annullato la precedente decisione che aveva rifiutato la registrazione di tale marchio sonoro per mancanza di carattere distintivo.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORE

09
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Instagram Opposes Instagoods Trademark.
  1. As Face Masks, Shields Become a Fashion Category of Their Own, Brands Are Rushing to File Trademark Applications.
  1. When goodwill in the business is not enough: clarifying the role of the trademark in a passing off action.
  1. First GI registration in ARIPO supported by EUIPO.
  1. Clarivate launches Domains for Good.
  1. WIPO’s Anti-“Cybersquatting” Service: 50,000 Cases and Growing amid COVID-19 Surge.
  1. German Bundestag approves ratification bill on the Unified Patent Court Agreement.
  1. Judge Albright’s Latest Rules Ensure the WDTXs Place as the New Patent Rocket Docket.
  1. Is it time to move on from the AI inventor debate?
  1. CMA Moves to Investigate ‘Green’ Claims
MORE

09
12
20

HAMILTON V HAMILTON: HOW WATCHMAKER BEATS F1 CHAMPION…IN COURT

di Beatrice Marone

 

Who would have thought that the first stop in the chain of successes established by Lewis Hamilton wouldn’t have come from the racing circuit but from a court?

 

In case R-351/2020-4, on 20th October 2020, the EUIPO Fourth Board of Appeal ruled on the cancellation proceeding no. 17968 C brought by 44IP Limited against the EUTM registration n. 13496013 relating to the word mark “HAMILTON”, owned by Hamilton International AG.

 

44IP Limited acted as the holder of the IP rights related to the racing driver Lewis Hamilton and is currently the proprietor, in several jurisdictions, of trademark “LH44”, associating the initials of the seven-times F1 Championship winner with the driver number he chose in 2014 to compete with until the end of his career.

 

Hamilton International AG, founded in Pennsylvania in 1892, has an history in the watch industry with appearances even on the big screen but it is also committed to innovation since the launch of the first electric timepiece in 1957 and the LED digital watch in 1970. It is part of the Swiss Swatch group since 2007.

 

The centre of the cancellation claim has been the above-cited EU trademark no. 13496013 “HAMILTON”, registered in 2015 for goods in class 9 and 14. In 2017, after receiving from Hamilton International AG an opposition to the registration of its trademark application n. 14365837 “LEWIS HAMILTON”, 44IP Limited filed an application for declaration of invalidity. Highlighting the existence of an earlier registration both for the same word and by the same proprietor for goods in the sole class 14, the legal team of 44IP Limited argued that the subsequent registration was only an attempt to extend the grace period for non-use, pointing out bad faith and impediment of fair competition. Following the arguments of Hamilton International AG, which showed that the update of the list of goods in class 14 was due to both technological development in the horological field and to the outcome of the IP Translator judgement and, at same time, filed evidence of genuine use of the contested trademark, the Cancellation Division rejected the invalidation action in 2019.

 

On February 2020, 44IP Limited filed an appeal requesting the Board to annul the above-cited decision in its entirety. On which grounds?

 

  • unsupported and inconsistent assertions of good faith by the proprietor;
  • wrong interpretation of the list of goods as sufficiently different from the earlier registration and no evidence of its use for certain categories of goods;
  • revocation proceedings of the earlier registration and consequences of SkyKick judgement not taken into due consideration by the Cancellation Division.

 

The Board considered the appeal not well-founded and dismissed it, ordering the appellant to bear the costs of the proceedings, after pointing out the subsequent points.

 

There is no need for an EU trademark to give legitimate reasons for the filing of an application because the burden of proof on the fact that the proprietor acted in bad faith at the moment of filing is on the cancellation applicant (Pelikan, T-136/11) and, moreover, the same cancellation applicant has no title whatsoever to intrude the proprietor’s strategy regarding both the present and the intended use of the trademark. To analyse whether the trademark applicant is acting in bad faith within Article 59(1)(b) EUTMR it is necessary to take into account all the relevant factors of the specific case (Lindt Goldhase, C-529/07): none of the ones raised by the cancellation applicant has been found in the case at hand and these are the only ones that the Board can assess, as stated in Article 95(1) EUTMR.

 

The Board also highlighted that 44IP Limited itself admitted, repeatedly, the use both of the earlier registration and of the contested mark and this fact, along with the evidence provided by Hamilton International AG, conducted to the recognition of the genuine use, concluding the paragraph with the sentence “There can be no bad faith for non-use if there is use”.

 

Regarding the revocation proceedings of the earlier registration, the Board found that they were started by the same cancellation applicant and are still ongoing. Briefly on the SkyKick judgement (C-371/18), the Board emphasised how it was rendered four months before the cancellation applicant’s statement of grounds and how the arguments upon which both the proceedings at hand and the nominal case were based have been dismissed by the CJEU.

 

In conclusion, not even the argument on the IP rights of Lewis Hamilton is acceptable because the contested mark consists only of the word “HAMILTON”, which is reckoned as a “rather common surname in English-speaking countries”. The Board also reminds how, when the registration of the name could lead to infringement of third parties’ rights, there is no natural right to the same registration (ARRIGO CIPRIANI/CIPRIANI, R 406/2018-4). Furthermore, the mark has been used since 1892, almost a century before the birth of the natural person Lewis Hamilton. Finally, the Board found that 44IP Limited failed to explain under which legal concept a company is able to invoke the personality rights of an individual person.

 

The present judgement gives precious hints about the development of IP rights in the ever-growing number of occasions when celebrities, and especially sports champions, are rushing to ask for their protection.

MORE

02
12
20

Il Tribunale di Milano conferma la propria competenza giurisdizionale per i casi di presunta violazione dei diritti di marchio mediante vendita online di prodotti tra Stati diversi dell’Unione Europea.

di Serena Bertinetto

 

Con la sentenza dello scorso 28 ottobre 2020, il Tribunale di Milano è tornato a pronunciarsi sul tema della sussistenza di giurisdizione italiana per i casi di lamentata violazione dei diritti di marchio mediante la vendita online di prodotti all’interno di Stati dell’Unione Europea differenti.

 

Nel 2017 la società MAX MARA FASHION GROUP S.R.L. (di seguito, “MAX MARA”) si rivolgeva infatti al Tribunale di Milano per convenire in giudizio la società spagnola BALNEO ELEMENTS S.L. (di seguito, “BALNEO ELEMENTS”) al fine di ottenere, tra le altre cose, l’accertamento della condotta illecita di quest’ultima, l’inibitoria della prosecuzione della stessa condotta ed il risarcimento del conseguente danno subito.

 

In particolare, MAX MARA contestava che l’utilizzo da parte di BALNEO ELEMENTS del marchio “Mi&Co” su prodotti di abbigliamento e articoli accessori costituisse violazione delle proprie privative sul segno “MAX&Co.”, tanto ai sensi degli art. 20, comma 1, lett. b) del Codice della proprietà industriale e intellettuale (di seguito, “c.p.i.”) e dell’art. 9 lett. b) del Regolamento (UE) 2017/1001 (di seguito, “RMUE”), per il rischio di confusione tra i segni e il rischio di associazione tra le imprese, quanto ai sensi dell’art. 20, comma, 1 lett. c) c.p.i. e dell’art. 9 lett. c) RMUE, per l'appropriazione illecita del carattere attrattivo derivante dalla rinomanza del proprio marchio (registrato quale marchio italiano nel 1999 e quale marchio dell’Unione Europea nel 2001).

 

A sostegno di tali argomentazioni MAX MARA documentava l’acquisto effettuato sul sito www.miandco.es di una camicetta recante il marchio oggetto di contestazione, consegnata presso l’indirizzo dell’acquirente in Milano.

 

Proprio sulla base di tale presupposto fattuale, il Tribunale di Milano ha confermato la propria competenza giurisdizionale ai sensi dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento (UE) n. 1215/2012 (di seguito, “Regolamento Bruxelles I bis”).

 

Come noto, secondo tale norma, un soggetto può essere convenuto in uno Stato membro diverso da quello del proprio domicilio “in materia di illeciti civili dolosi o colposi, davanti all’autorità giurisdizionale del luogo in cui l’evento dannoso è avvenuto o può avvenire”. Secondo giurisprudenza costante, il concetto di “luogo dove avviene l’evento dannoso” può indicare sia il luogo dove è avvenuto l’evento che causa il danno, sia il luogo dove il danno è avvenuto. La scelta è rimessa all’attore.

 

Tale apparente vantaggio in capo a chi intende instaurare un’azione è stato nel tempo attenuato dalla Corte di Giustizia Europea con la formulazione del c.d. “mosaic principle” (caso Shevill, C-68/93, Fiona Shevill v. Presse Alliance S.A., 1995), al fine di limitare l’eccessiva (e diffusa) pratica del forum shopping.

 

Nello specifico, il mosaic principle – applicato, peraltro, anche dal Tribunale nella decisione in commento – consente all’attore di agire dinnanzi al foro identificato ex art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis, invocando e lamentando unicamente il danno subito in tale territorio, ad esclusione di ogni danno ulteriore.

 

Come anticipato, nel caso in commento l’applicazione dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis ha portato i giudici milanesi a confermare la sussistenza della giurisdizione italiana. Infatti, secondo il Collegio, l’accessibilità e semplicità del procedimento di acquisto proprio del sito www.miandco.es, la comprensibilità della lingua spagnola per i consumatori italiani, la comunanza della moneta europea, nonché gli agevoli sistemi di pagamento elettronico, costituiscono elementi che consentono di considerare tale sito come rivolto (altresì) al pubblico italiano (come evidenziato dalla facilità dell’acquisto documentato nel corso del procedimento).

 

Dopo aver confermato la sussistenza della giurisdizione italiana (nonché la propria competenza, ai sensi dell’art. 120, comma 6, c.p.i.) ai fini di decidere la controversia, il Tribunale di Milano ha poi ritenuto che la condotta posta in essere dalla BALNEO ELEMENTS costituisse violazione dei diritti di esclusiva di parte attrice. I giudici hanno, infatti, evidenziato la forte “somiglianza strutturale” tra il marchio contestato e quelli di titolarità di MAX MARA, oltre che la notevole somiglianza fonetica e visiva tra i marchi, a fronte di una totale identità o forte affinità dei prodotti contraddistinti dai due segni.

 

La decisione ora commentata si rivela, senz’altro, di forte interesse, in particolare alla luce della dinamica lettura che il Tribunale di Milano ha fornito dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis. Questo caso rappresenta infatti un valido precedente, che potrà essere invocato da soggetti che lamentino un danno causato dalla violazione dei propri diritti di esclusiva nazionali tramite siti di e-commerce facenti capo a società domiciliate in un differente Stato dell’Unione Europea.

MORE

30
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Chanel Says The RealReal Has Failed to Show that it Actually Maintains a Monopoly in High-End Handbag Market.

 

  1. Düsseldorf court refers questions on component-level SEP licensing to CJEU in Nokia/Daimler.

 

  1. European Commission unveils new Action Plan on Intellectual Property to strengthen EU's economic resilience and recovery.

 

  1. How Patents Helped Sprout the World’s First Plantable Pencil.

 

  1. Cheese cease and desist controversy.

 

  1. Amazon and the IPR Center team up to combat counterfeiting.

 

  1. Thought Experiment: Is Our Patent System Ready for a Potential Future of Brain Interfacing?

 

  1. UK faces calls to drop opposition to patent-free Covid vaccines.

 

  1. Facebook, Twitter Sued Over IP Used To Quash COVID-19 Lies.

 

  1. Italian Customs Seize China-made Counterfeit Bearings.
MORE

27
11
20

La CGUE conferma che nessuna remunerazione è dovuta per la diffusione di fonogrammi contenuti in opere audiovisive (Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación SA contro AGEDI e AIE - C‑14719)

Di Marco Zugna

 

Con sentenza del 18 novembre 2020 caso C147/19, la Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea (“CGUE”) si è espressa sui temi della comunicazione al pubblico di opere audiovisive, di fonogrammi, di loro riproduzioni coperte da diritto d’autore e del connesso diritto ad un’equa remunerazione per gli artisti, interpreti o esecutori, e produttori di fonogrammi. A livello europeo tale remunerazione è garantita dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2 delle Direttive 92/100/CEE del Consiglio del 19 novembre 1992 e 2006/115/CE del Parlamento europeo e del Consiglio del 12 dicembre 2006, riguardanti il diritto di noleggio, il diritto di prestito e taluni diritti connessi al diritto d’autore in materia di proprietà intellettuale. Si segnala, a scopo puramente informativo, che tale diritto alla remunerazione dei soggetti sopra citati è inoltre garantito, in Italia, dall’articolo 73 della Legge 22 aprile 1941, n. 633 (Legge sul diritto d’autore).

 

Il 29 luglio 2010 gli enti spagnoli rappresentativi degli interessi dei produttori di fonogrammi e di artisti, interpreti o esecutori, nel campo della proprietà intellettuale (rispettivamente Asociación de Gestión de Derechos Intelectuales e Artistas Intérpretes o Ejecutantes, Sociedad de Gestión de España) citavano in giudizio presso il Tribunale commerciale di Madrid l’Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación SA, società proprietaria di varie reti televisive, sulle quali vengono trasmesse al grande pubblico opere audiovisive. Le associazioni menzionate chiedevano ad Atresmedia un indennizzo, in favore dei propri assistiti, a fronte della comunicazione al pubblico di fonogrammi di titolarità degli aderenti alle associazioni stesse o di riproduzioni dei medesimi fonogrammi a fini commerciali, comunicazioni entrambe poste in essere per tramite delle opere audiovisive trasmesse dalla società sulle proprie reti.

 

A seguito del rigetto, da parte della Corte di primo grado, della domanda attorea per infondatezza della stessa, gli enti sopracitati ottenevano, successivamente, l’annullamento di tale sentenza di primo grado e l’accoglimento della domanda da parte della Corte provinciale di Madrid, avanti alla quale avevano presentato appello. La Corte suprema spagnola, chiamata a decidere dell’ulteriore ricorso presentato da Atresmedia nei confronti della decisione di secondo grado, decideva – quindi – di sospendere il procedimento per sottoporre alla Corte Europea due questioni pregiudiziali: 1- Se la diffusione per scopi commerciali di un fonogramma  contenuto all’interno di un’opera audiovisiva possa, o meno, qualificarsi quale “riproduzione di un fonogramma pubblicato a scopi commerciali” secondo quanto disposto dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115; 2- Se tale diffusione di fonogramma, contenuta in un’opera audiovisiva comunicata al pubblico, dia, o meno, diritto agli artisti, interpreti o esecutori, e ai produttori di fonogrammi all’equa remunerazione, così come prevista in favore degli stessi dai medesimi articoli delle menzionate Direttive.

 

Atteso quanto sopra, occorre puntualizzare che le Direttive citate non contengono una definizione di “fonogramma” e di “riproduzione di fonogramma”, né contengono un rinvio al diritto degli Stati Membri per l’interpretazione di tali termini: per tale motivo, secondo quanto stabilito dalla CGUE nella precedente sentenza dell’8 settembre 2020, Recorded Artists Actors Performers, C265/19, l’interpretazione dei termini considerati va effettuata tenendo conto del “… tenore letterale di tale disposizione, del contesto in cui essa si inserisce, in particolare della sua genesi e del diritto internazionale, nonché degli scopi perseguiti dalla normativa di cui essa fa parte…”.

 

La Corte, dunque, nell’ambito della sentenza C14719 qui esaminata, faceva riferimento all’articolo 3, lettera b), della Convenzione di Roma del 26 ottobre 1961 e all’articolo 2, lettera b), del Trattato dell’Organizzazione mondiale della proprietà intellettuale (OMPI) sulle interpretazioni ed esecuzioni e sui fonogrammi (altresì noto come “TIEF”). Questi articoli definiscono i “fonogrammi” quali fissazioni esclusivamente sonore dei suoni di un’esecuzione o di altri suoni, non incorporate in un’opera cinematografica o in altra opera audiovisiva. Sulla base di quanto premesso, la Corte giungeva, dunque, alla conclusione che “…un fonogramma incorporato in un’opera cinematografica o in un’altra opera audiovisiva perde la sua qualità di «fonogramma» in quanto fa parte di una simile opera, senza tuttavia che tale circostanza abbia una qualche incidenza sui diritti su tale fonogramma in caso di utilizzo di quest’ultimo indipendentemente dall’opera di cui trattasi.” Poiché la legittimità dell’inclusione del fonogramma all’interno dell’opera audiovisiva, frutto di accordi estranei ad Atresmedia con i titolari dei diritti sul fonogramma, non è mai stata oggetto di dibattito e poiché, al contempo, non è mai stata contestata ad Atresmedia un’ipotetica trasmissione al pubblico del fonogramma in maniera disgiunta dall’opera audiovisiva in cui è inclusa, la Corte giungeva alla conclusione che non sussiste giustificazione per il pagamento di un’equa indennità in favore degli artisti interpreti o esecutori e dei produttori di fonogrammi.

 

Per quanto concerne la definizione di “riproduzione di fonogramma” contenuta negli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115, la Corte ne affrontava l’interpretazione affidandosi nuovamente all’articolo 3, lettera b), della Convenzione di Roma e all’articolo 2, lettera b) del TIEF: essi qualificano la riproduzione come l’attività di “realizzazione di un esemplare o di più esemplari di una fissazione” di un suono. In termini più facilmente comprensibili, ciò comporta la creazione di copie del supporto su cui è registrata la traccia sonora. Tuttavia, il comportamento descritto dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115, fondamento del diritto all’equa remunerazione degli artisti e dei produttori di fonogrammi, non è quello della realizzazione di copie del fonogramma quanto, invece, quello della comunicazione e della trasmissione al pubblico per scopi commerciali dei fonogrammi o di sue rappresentazioni. Alla luce del fatto che le opere audiovisive contenenti riproduzioni di fonogrammi non possono essere considerate a loro volta fonogrammi, la diffusione al pubblico di riproduzioni delle suddette opere audiovisive non può dare diritto ad un’equa remunerazione in favore dei soggetti tutelati dalla Direttiva 92/100 e dalla Direttiva 2006/115.

 

Quanto esposto dalla CGUE dà vita ad un principio estremamente importante: la molteplicità di opere di varia tipologia che partecipano alla creazione di un’opera cinematografica/audiovisiva (immagini, musiche, testi, performance, etc.), previa autorizzazione dei singoli titolari dei diritti, porta alla creazione di un nuovo, autonomo oggetto di diritti di proprietà intellettuale, slegato dalle singole opere che compongono l’opera cinematografica/audiovisiva. Per tale motivo, la diffusione al pubblico a fini commerciali di tale opera potrà avvenire esclusivamente tramite un accordo con i soli titolari dei diritti di sfruttamento sull’opera stessa.

MORE

25
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Why It’s Time to Board the PCT Train: The Benefits of Filing U.S. Patent Applications via the PCT First: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/11/22/time-board-pct-train-benefits-filing-us-patent-applications-via-pct-first/id=127518/;
  2. New York Times Sues TIME Magazine Over ‘Times Talks’ Trademark: https://lawandcrime.com/lawsuit/new-york-times-sues-time-magazine-over-times-talks-trademark/;
  3. Burberry is Suing Rapper “Burberry Jesus” for Trademark Infringement, Dilution: https://www.thefashionlaw.com/burberry-is-suing-rapper-burberry-jesus-for-trademark-infringement-dilution/;
  4. Mind the gap: Beijing IP Court explains the adverse effect clause of China’s Trade Mark Law: https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/11/mind-gap-beijing-ip-court-explains.html;
  5. Star Wars author appeals to Disney in fight over royalties: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/nov/19/sstar-wars-author-disney-royalties-alan-dean-foster;
  6. Copyright for Choreography: When is Copying a Dance a Copyright Violation?: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/11/19/copyright-choreography-copying-dance-copyright-violation/id=127455/;
  7. New EPO study: European patents preferred tool for the commercialisation of inventions developed by Europe's universities and public research organisations: https://www.epo.org/news-events/news/2020/20201124.html;
  8. Ferrari Loses Race for 250 GTO Trademark: Risks Arising From Non-Use of Registered Trademarks: https://www.iptechblog.com/2020/11/ferrari-loses-race-for-250-gto-trademark-risks-arising-from-non-use-of-registered-trademarks/;
MORE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »