Questo sito o gli strumenti terzi da questo utilizzati si avvalgono di cookie necessari al funzionamento ed utili alle finalità illustrate nella cookie policy. Se vuoi saperne di più o negare il consenso a tutti o ad alcuni cookie visita questo link. Chiudendo questo banner, scorrendo questa pagina, cliccando su un link o proseguendo la navigazione in altra maniera, acconsenti all'uso dei cookie. X

NEWS

14
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. In a Blow to Experience-Art Emporium Meow Wolf, a Judge Allows an Artist’s Copyright Lawsuit to Proceed
  1. Se Gio Ponti finisce su una tovaglia
  1. 14th edition of the ICC Intellectual Property Roadmap Published
  1. EPO Study: Innovation in Smart Connected Objects on the Rise
  1. Patents and royalties battle with Samsung hits Ericsson shares
  1. Apple is sued by rival over alleged App Store monopoly
  1. EUIPO-KIPO Exchange on new technologies and AI
  1. Chappelle's Show on Netflix - the unforgiving tension between an artist and the creations he does not own
  1. Angry Birds vs Angry Chicken: Trademark Case Filed With USPTO
  1. Nike and Warren Lotas Settle Trademark Suit Over “Illegal Fake” Sneakers

 

 

MORE

09
12
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Instagram Opposes Instagoods Trademark.
  1. As Face Masks, Shields Become a Fashion Category of Their Own, Brands Are Rushing to File Trademark Applications.
  1. When goodwill in the business is not enough: clarifying the role of the trademark in a passing off action.
  1. First GI registration in ARIPO supported by EUIPO.
  1. Clarivate launches Domains for Good.
  1. WIPO’s Anti-“Cybersquatting” Service: 50,000 Cases and Growing amid COVID-19 Surge.
  1. German Bundestag approves ratification bill on the Unified Patent Court Agreement.
  1. Judge Albright’s Latest Rules Ensure the WDTXs Place as the New Patent Rocket Docket.
  1. Is it time to move on from the AI inventor debate?
  1. CMA Moves to Investigate ‘Green’ Claims
MORE

09
12
20

HAMILTON V HAMILTON: HOW WATCHMAKER BEATS F1 CHAMPION…IN COURT

di Beatrice Marone

 

Who would have thought that the first stop in the chain of successes established by Lewis Hamilton wouldn’t have come from the racing circuit but from a court?

 

In case R-351/2020-4, on 20th October 2020, the EUIPO Fourth Board of Appeal ruled on the cancellation proceeding no. 17968 C brought by 44IP Limited against the EUTM registration n. 13496013 relating to the word mark “HAMILTON”, owned by Hamilton International AG.

 

44IP Limited acted as the holder of the IP rights related to the racing driver Lewis Hamilton and is currently the proprietor, in several jurisdictions, of trademark “LH44”, associating the initials of the seven-times F1 Championship winner with the driver number he chose in 2014 to compete with until the end of his career.

 

Hamilton International AG, founded in Pennsylvania in 1892, has an history in the watch industry with appearances even on the big screen but it is also committed to innovation since the launch of the first electric timepiece in 1957 and the LED digital watch in 1970. It is part of the Swiss Swatch group since 2007.

 

The centre of the cancellation claim has been the above-cited EU trademark no. 13496013 “HAMILTON”, registered in 2015 for goods in class 9 and 14. In 2017, after receiving from Hamilton International AG an opposition to the registration of its trademark application n. 14365837 “LEWIS HAMILTON”, 44IP Limited filed an application for declaration of invalidity. Highlighting the existence of an earlier registration both for the same word and by the same proprietor for goods in the sole class 14, the legal team of 44IP Limited argued that the subsequent registration was only an attempt to extend the grace period for non-use, pointing out bad faith and impediment of fair competition. Following the arguments of Hamilton International AG, which showed that the update of the list of goods in class 14 was due to both technological development in the horological field and to the outcome of the IP Translator judgement and, at same time, filed evidence of genuine use of the contested trademark, the Cancellation Division rejected the invalidation action in 2019.

 

On February 2020, 44IP Limited filed an appeal requesting the Board to annul the above-cited decision in its entirety. On which grounds?

 

  • unsupported and inconsistent assertions of good faith by the proprietor;
  • wrong interpretation of the list of goods as sufficiently different from the earlier registration and no evidence of its use for certain categories of goods;
  • revocation proceedings of the earlier registration and consequences of SkyKick judgement not taken into due consideration by the Cancellation Division.

 

The Board considered the appeal not well-founded and dismissed it, ordering the appellant to bear the costs of the proceedings, after pointing out the subsequent points.

 

There is no need for an EU trademark to give legitimate reasons for the filing of an application because the burden of proof on the fact that the proprietor acted in bad faith at the moment of filing is on the cancellation applicant (Pelikan, T-136/11) and, moreover, the same cancellation applicant has no title whatsoever to intrude the proprietor’s strategy regarding both the present and the intended use of the trademark. To analyse whether the trademark applicant is acting in bad faith within Article 59(1)(b) EUTMR it is necessary to take into account all the relevant factors of the specific case (Lindt Goldhase, C-529/07): none of the ones raised by the cancellation applicant has been found in the case at hand and these are the only ones that the Board can assess, as stated in Article 95(1) EUTMR.

 

The Board also highlighted that 44IP Limited itself admitted, repeatedly, the use both of the earlier registration and of the contested mark and this fact, along with the evidence provided by Hamilton International AG, conducted to the recognition of the genuine use, concluding the paragraph with the sentence “There can be no bad faith for non-use if there is use”.

 

Regarding the revocation proceedings of the earlier registration, the Board found that they were started by the same cancellation applicant and are still ongoing. Briefly on the SkyKick judgement (C-371/18), the Board emphasised how it was rendered four months before the cancellation applicant’s statement of grounds and how the arguments upon which both the proceedings at hand and the nominal case were based have been dismissed by the CJEU.

 

In conclusion, not even the argument on the IP rights of Lewis Hamilton is acceptable because the contested mark consists only of the word “HAMILTON”, which is reckoned as a “rather common surname in English-speaking countries”. The Board also reminds how, when the registration of the name could lead to infringement of third parties’ rights, there is no natural right to the same registration (ARRIGO CIPRIANI/CIPRIANI, R 406/2018-4). Furthermore, the mark has been used since 1892, almost a century before the birth of the natural person Lewis Hamilton. Finally, the Board found that 44IP Limited failed to explain under which legal concept a company is able to invoke the personality rights of an individual person.

 

The present judgement gives precious hints about the development of IP rights in the ever-growing number of occasions when celebrities, and especially sports champions, are rushing to ask for their protection.

MORE

02
12
20

Il Tribunale di Milano conferma la propria competenza giurisdizionale per i casi di presunta violazione dei diritti di marchio mediante vendita online di prodotti tra Stati diversi dell’Unione Europea.

di Serena Bertinetto

 

Con la sentenza dello scorso 28 ottobre 2020, il Tribunale di Milano è tornato a pronunciarsi sul tema della sussistenza di giurisdizione italiana per i casi di lamentata violazione dei diritti di marchio mediante la vendita online di prodotti all’interno di Stati dell’Unione Europea differenti.

 

Nel 2017 la società MAX MARA FASHION GROUP S.R.L. (di seguito, “MAX MARA”) si rivolgeva infatti al Tribunale di Milano per convenire in giudizio la società spagnola BALNEO ELEMENTS S.L. (di seguito, “BALNEO ELEMENTS”) al fine di ottenere, tra le altre cose, l’accertamento della condotta illecita di quest’ultima, l’inibitoria della prosecuzione della stessa condotta ed il risarcimento del conseguente danno subito.

 

In particolare, MAX MARA contestava che l’utilizzo da parte di BALNEO ELEMENTS del marchio “Mi&Co” su prodotti di abbigliamento e articoli accessori costituisse violazione delle proprie privative sul segno “MAX&Co.”, tanto ai sensi degli art. 20, comma 1, lett. b) del Codice della proprietà industriale e intellettuale (di seguito, “c.p.i.”) e dell’art. 9 lett. b) del Regolamento (UE) 2017/1001 (di seguito, “RMUE”), per il rischio di confusione tra i segni e il rischio di associazione tra le imprese, quanto ai sensi dell’art. 20, comma, 1 lett. c) c.p.i. e dell’art. 9 lett. c) RMUE, per l'appropriazione illecita del carattere attrattivo derivante dalla rinomanza del proprio marchio (registrato quale marchio italiano nel 1999 e quale marchio dell’Unione Europea nel 2001).

 

A sostegno di tali argomentazioni MAX MARA documentava l’acquisto effettuato sul sito www.miandco.es di una camicetta recante il marchio oggetto di contestazione, consegnata presso l’indirizzo dell’acquirente in Milano.

 

Proprio sulla base di tale presupposto fattuale, il Tribunale di Milano ha confermato la propria competenza giurisdizionale ai sensi dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento (UE) n. 1215/2012 (di seguito, “Regolamento Bruxelles I bis”).

 

Come noto, secondo tale norma, un soggetto può essere convenuto in uno Stato membro diverso da quello del proprio domicilio “in materia di illeciti civili dolosi o colposi, davanti all’autorità giurisdizionale del luogo in cui l’evento dannoso è avvenuto o può avvenire”. Secondo giurisprudenza costante, il concetto di “luogo dove avviene l’evento dannoso” può indicare sia il luogo dove è avvenuto l’evento che causa il danno, sia il luogo dove il danno è avvenuto. La scelta è rimessa all’attore.

 

Tale apparente vantaggio in capo a chi intende instaurare un’azione è stato nel tempo attenuato dalla Corte di Giustizia Europea con la formulazione del c.d. “mosaic principle” (caso Shevill, C-68/93, Fiona Shevill v. Presse Alliance S.A., 1995), al fine di limitare l’eccessiva (e diffusa) pratica del forum shopping.

 

Nello specifico, il mosaic principle – applicato, peraltro, anche dal Tribunale nella decisione in commento – consente all’attore di agire dinnanzi al foro identificato ex art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis, invocando e lamentando unicamente il danno subito in tale territorio, ad esclusione di ogni danno ulteriore.

 

Come anticipato, nel caso in commento l’applicazione dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis ha portato i giudici milanesi a confermare la sussistenza della giurisdizione italiana. Infatti, secondo il Collegio, l’accessibilità e semplicità del procedimento di acquisto proprio del sito www.miandco.es, la comprensibilità della lingua spagnola per i consumatori italiani, la comunanza della moneta europea, nonché gli agevoli sistemi di pagamento elettronico, costituiscono elementi che consentono di considerare tale sito come rivolto (altresì) al pubblico italiano (come evidenziato dalla facilità dell’acquisto documentato nel corso del procedimento).

 

Dopo aver confermato la sussistenza della giurisdizione italiana (nonché la propria competenza, ai sensi dell’art. 120, comma 6, c.p.i.) ai fini di decidere la controversia, il Tribunale di Milano ha poi ritenuto che la condotta posta in essere dalla BALNEO ELEMENTS costituisse violazione dei diritti di esclusiva di parte attrice. I giudici hanno, infatti, evidenziato la forte “somiglianza strutturale” tra il marchio contestato e quelli di titolarità di MAX MARA, oltre che la notevole somiglianza fonetica e visiva tra i marchi, a fronte di una totale identità o forte affinità dei prodotti contraddistinti dai due segni.

 

La decisione ora commentata si rivela, senz’altro, di forte interesse, in particolare alla luce della dinamica lettura che il Tribunale di Milano ha fornito dell’art. 7(2) del Regolamento Bruxelles I bis. Questo caso rappresenta infatti un valido precedente, che potrà essere invocato da soggetti che lamentino un danno causato dalla violazione dei propri diritti di esclusiva nazionali tramite siti di e-commerce facenti capo a società domiciliate in un differente Stato dell’Unione Europea.

MORE

30
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Chanel Says The RealReal Has Failed to Show that it Actually Maintains a Monopoly in High-End Handbag Market.

 

  1. Düsseldorf court refers questions on component-level SEP licensing to CJEU in Nokia/Daimler.

 

  1. European Commission unveils new Action Plan on Intellectual Property to strengthen EU's economic resilience and recovery.

 

  1. How Patents Helped Sprout the World’s First Plantable Pencil.

 

  1. Cheese cease and desist controversy.

 

  1. Amazon and the IPR Center team up to combat counterfeiting.

 

  1. Thought Experiment: Is Our Patent System Ready for a Potential Future of Brain Interfacing?

 

  1. UK faces calls to drop opposition to patent-free Covid vaccines.

 

  1. Facebook, Twitter Sued Over IP Used To Quash COVID-19 Lies.

 

  1. Italian Customs Seize China-made Counterfeit Bearings.
MORE

27
11
20

La CGUE conferma che nessuna remunerazione è dovuta per la diffusione di fonogrammi contenuti in opere audiovisive (Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación SA contro AGEDI e AIE - C‑14719)

Di Marco Zugna

 

Con sentenza del 18 novembre 2020 caso C147/19, la Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea (“CGUE”) si è espressa sui temi della comunicazione al pubblico di opere audiovisive, di fonogrammi, di loro riproduzioni coperte da diritto d’autore e del connesso diritto ad un’equa remunerazione per gli artisti, interpreti o esecutori, e produttori di fonogrammi. A livello europeo tale remunerazione è garantita dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2 delle Direttive 92/100/CEE del Consiglio del 19 novembre 1992 e 2006/115/CE del Parlamento europeo e del Consiglio del 12 dicembre 2006, riguardanti il diritto di noleggio, il diritto di prestito e taluni diritti connessi al diritto d’autore in materia di proprietà intellettuale. Si segnala, a scopo puramente informativo, che tale diritto alla remunerazione dei soggetti sopra citati è inoltre garantito, in Italia, dall’articolo 73 della Legge 22 aprile 1941, n. 633 (Legge sul diritto d’autore).

 

Il 29 luglio 2010 gli enti spagnoli rappresentativi degli interessi dei produttori di fonogrammi e di artisti, interpreti o esecutori, nel campo della proprietà intellettuale (rispettivamente Asociación de Gestión de Derechos Intelectuales e Artistas Intérpretes o Ejecutantes, Sociedad de Gestión de España) citavano in giudizio presso il Tribunale commerciale di Madrid l’Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación SA, società proprietaria di varie reti televisive, sulle quali vengono trasmesse al grande pubblico opere audiovisive. Le associazioni menzionate chiedevano ad Atresmedia un indennizzo, in favore dei propri assistiti, a fronte della comunicazione al pubblico di fonogrammi di titolarità degli aderenti alle associazioni stesse o di riproduzioni dei medesimi fonogrammi a fini commerciali, comunicazioni entrambe poste in essere per tramite delle opere audiovisive trasmesse dalla società sulle proprie reti.

 

A seguito del rigetto, da parte della Corte di primo grado, della domanda attorea per infondatezza della stessa, gli enti sopracitati ottenevano, successivamente, l’annullamento di tale sentenza di primo grado e l’accoglimento della domanda da parte della Corte provinciale di Madrid, avanti alla quale avevano presentato appello. La Corte suprema spagnola, chiamata a decidere dell’ulteriore ricorso presentato da Atresmedia nei confronti della decisione di secondo grado, decideva – quindi – di sospendere il procedimento per sottoporre alla Corte Europea due questioni pregiudiziali: 1- Se la diffusione per scopi commerciali di un fonogramma  contenuto all’interno di un’opera audiovisiva possa, o meno, qualificarsi quale “riproduzione di un fonogramma pubblicato a scopi commerciali” secondo quanto disposto dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115; 2- Se tale diffusione di fonogramma, contenuta in un’opera audiovisiva comunicata al pubblico, dia, o meno, diritto agli artisti, interpreti o esecutori, e ai produttori di fonogrammi all’equa remunerazione, così come prevista in favore degli stessi dai medesimi articoli delle menzionate Direttive.

 

Atteso quanto sopra, occorre puntualizzare che le Direttive citate non contengono una definizione di “fonogramma” e di “riproduzione di fonogramma”, né contengono un rinvio al diritto degli Stati Membri per l’interpretazione di tali termini: per tale motivo, secondo quanto stabilito dalla CGUE nella precedente sentenza dell’8 settembre 2020, Recorded Artists Actors Performers, C265/19, l’interpretazione dei termini considerati va effettuata tenendo conto del “… tenore letterale di tale disposizione, del contesto in cui essa si inserisce, in particolare della sua genesi e del diritto internazionale, nonché degli scopi perseguiti dalla normativa di cui essa fa parte…”.

 

La Corte, dunque, nell’ambito della sentenza C14719 qui esaminata, faceva riferimento all’articolo 3, lettera b), della Convenzione di Roma del 26 ottobre 1961 e all’articolo 2, lettera b), del Trattato dell’Organizzazione mondiale della proprietà intellettuale (OMPI) sulle interpretazioni ed esecuzioni e sui fonogrammi (altresì noto come “TIEF”). Questi articoli definiscono i “fonogrammi” quali fissazioni esclusivamente sonore dei suoni di un’esecuzione o di altri suoni, non incorporate in un’opera cinematografica o in altra opera audiovisiva. Sulla base di quanto premesso, la Corte giungeva, dunque, alla conclusione che “…un fonogramma incorporato in un’opera cinematografica o in un’altra opera audiovisiva perde la sua qualità di «fonogramma» in quanto fa parte di una simile opera, senza tuttavia che tale circostanza abbia una qualche incidenza sui diritti su tale fonogramma in caso di utilizzo di quest’ultimo indipendentemente dall’opera di cui trattasi.” Poiché la legittimità dell’inclusione del fonogramma all’interno dell’opera audiovisiva, frutto di accordi estranei ad Atresmedia con i titolari dei diritti sul fonogramma, non è mai stata oggetto di dibattito e poiché, al contempo, non è mai stata contestata ad Atresmedia un’ipotetica trasmissione al pubblico del fonogramma in maniera disgiunta dall’opera audiovisiva in cui è inclusa, la Corte giungeva alla conclusione che non sussiste giustificazione per il pagamento di un’equa indennità in favore degli artisti interpreti o esecutori e dei produttori di fonogrammi.

 

Per quanto concerne la definizione di “riproduzione di fonogramma” contenuta negli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115, la Corte ne affrontava l’interpretazione affidandosi nuovamente all’articolo 3, lettera b), della Convenzione di Roma e all’articolo 2, lettera b) del TIEF: essi qualificano la riproduzione come l’attività di “realizzazione di un esemplare o di più esemplari di una fissazione” di un suono. In termini più facilmente comprensibili, ciò comporta la creazione di copie del supporto su cui è registrata la traccia sonora. Tuttavia, il comportamento descritto dagli articoli 8, paragrafo 2, della Direttiva 92/100 e della Direttiva 2006/115, fondamento del diritto all’equa remunerazione degli artisti e dei produttori di fonogrammi, non è quello della realizzazione di copie del fonogramma quanto, invece, quello della comunicazione e della trasmissione al pubblico per scopi commerciali dei fonogrammi o di sue rappresentazioni. Alla luce del fatto che le opere audiovisive contenenti riproduzioni di fonogrammi non possono essere considerate a loro volta fonogrammi, la diffusione al pubblico di riproduzioni delle suddette opere audiovisive non può dare diritto ad un’equa remunerazione in favore dei soggetti tutelati dalla Direttiva 92/100 e dalla Direttiva 2006/115.

 

Quanto esposto dalla CGUE dà vita ad un principio estremamente importante: la molteplicità di opere di varia tipologia che partecipano alla creazione di un’opera cinematografica/audiovisiva (immagini, musiche, testi, performance, etc.), previa autorizzazione dei singoli titolari dei diritti, porta alla creazione di un nuovo, autonomo oggetto di diritti di proprietà intellettuale, slegato dalle singole opere che compongono l’opera cinematografica/audiovisiva. Per tale motivo, la diffusione al pubblico a fini commerciali di tale opera potrà avvenire esclusivamente tramite un accordo con i soli titolari dei diritti di sfruttamento sull’opera stessa.

MORE

25
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Why It’s Time to Board the PCT Train: The Benefits of Filing U.S. Patent Applications via the PCT First: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/11/22/time-board-pct-train-benefits-filing-us-patent-applications-via-pct-first/id=127518/;
  2. New York Times Sues TIME Magazine Over ‘Times Talks’ Trademark: https://lawandcrime.com/lawsuit/new-york-times-sues-time-magazine-over-times-talks-trademark/;
  3. Burberry is Suing Rapper “Burberry Jesus” for Trademark Infringement, Dilution: https://www.thefashionlaw.com/burberry-is-suing-rapper-burberry-jesus-for-trademark-infringement-dilution/;
  4. Mind the gap: Beijing IP Court explains the adverse effect clause of China’s Trade Mark Law: https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/11/mind-gap-beijing-ip-court-explains.html;
  5. Star Wars author appeals to Disney in fight over royalties: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/nov/19/sstar-wars-author-disney-royalties-alan-dean-foster;
  6. Copyright for Choreography: When is Copying a Dance a Copyright Violation?: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/11/19/copyright-choreography-copying-dance-copyright-violation/id=127455/;
  7. New EPO study: European patents preferred tool for the commercialisation of inventions developed by Europe's universities and public research organisations: https://www.epo.org/news-events/news/2020/20201124.html;
  8. Ferrari Loses Race for 250 GTO Trademark: Risks Arising From Non-Use of Registered Trademarks: https://www.iptechblog.com/2020/11/ferrari-loses-race-for-250-gto-trademark-risks-arising-from-non-use-of-registered-trademarks/;
MORE

23
11
20

La reputazione del marchio anteriore nella valutazione sulla confondibilità tra segni: CGUE – Causa: C-115/2019 P

La Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea (CGUE), nell’ambito della sentenza emessa all’esito della causa C-115/2019 P, ha recentemente avuto modo di pronunciarsi con riferimento al tema delle modalità di valutazione del rischio di confusione tra segni in funzione della notorietà di un marchio anteriore. Per il tramite della pronuncia pocanzi citata, la CGUE ha finalmente risolto un’ambiguità interpretativa di particolare insidiosità, riscontrando un errore di diritto nel valutare la somiglianza tra segni in conflitto in ragione della sola eventuale reputazione del marchio anteriore.

 

La sentenza in esame rappresenta l’epilogo di un procedimento che prende le mosse dall’opposizione depositata da parte dal Groupement des cartes bancaires sulla base del proprio anteriore marchio figurativo UE n. 269415 (raffigurante una versione stilizzata delle lettere “CB”) e diretta nei confronti della domanda di marchio figurativo UE n. 13359609 di titolarità della China Construction Bank Corporation (raffigurante, a sua volta, una versione stilizzata delle lettere “CCB”). Il 4 ottobre 2016, la Divisione d’Opposizione dell’EUIPO accertava la sussistenza di un rischio di confusione per il pubblico dei consumatori e, conseguentemente, accoglieva l’opposizione depositata dal GCB. All’esito del ricorso presentato dalla China Construction Bank Corporation, tale decisione veniva confermata anche in secondo grado da parte della competente Commissione di Ricorso dell’EUIPO, che riteneva integralmente fondate le motivazioni poste a sostegno della decisione di primo grado da parte della Divisione d’Opposizione.

 

Una volta inutilmente esperiti i primi due gradi di giudizio, la China Construction Bank Corporation impugnava – in data 27 settembre 2017 – la decisione emessa in secondo grado innanzi al competente Tribunale dell’Unione Europea. Nell’ambito di tale impugnazione, la China Construction Bank Corporation deduceva – in particolare – un motivo vertente sull’asserita violazione dell’articolo 8, paragrafo 1, lettera b), del Regolamento n. 207/2009, mediante il quale criticava la valutazione della prima Commissione di Ricorso dell’EUIPO in merito: 1) al carattere distintivo del marchio anteriore, 2) alla somiglianza dei segni in conflitto e 3) all’esistenza di un rischio di confusione tra i segni in conflitto. La critica di maggior rilievo verteva, in particolare, sul terzo dei punti pocanzi citati, in relazione al quale la China Construction Bank Corporation adduceva che la Commissione di Ricorso dell’EUIPO avesse commesso un grave errore di diritto nel tener conto della reputazione del marchio anteriore all’atto di esperire il giudizio di confondibilità tra i segni in conflitto (giungendo, persino, a valutare i segni in questione come se si trattasse di marchi denominativi e non, invece, confrontando i medesimi nella loro precipua configurazione grafica).

 

Tuttavia, sulla scorta di motivazioni del tutto simili a quelle sviluppate all’esito dei precedenti gradi di giudizio, il Tribunale respingeva – anch’esso – l’impugnazione proposta da parte della China Construction Bank Corporation, ritenendo infondate le argomentazioni della ricorrente. Quest’ultima, dunque, ricorreva in ultima istanza innanzi alla Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione Europea (CGUE), ribandendo – in aggiunta ad ulteriori motivi di impugnazione relativi a questioni prettamente procedurali e di asserita errata valutazione delle allegazioni probatorie fornite dalla controparte – il motivo basato sull’erroneità in diritto di un giudizio di valutazione globale sulla confondibilità tra segni che si fondi precipuamente sulla reputazione del marchio anteriore.

 

Ebbene, in ultima istanza la CGUE riteneva di dover condividere le argomentazioni poste a sostegno dei propri motivi di impugnazione da parte della China Construction Bank Corporation. In una pronuncia di segno diametralmente opposto a quelle dei gradi di giudizio precedenti, infatti, la CGUE ha precisato come i fattori relativi alla reputazione ed al carattere distintivo del marchio anteriore non implichino un confronto tra diversi segni, ma – al contrario – riguardino un solo ed unico segno (ossia quello che l’opponente abbia registrato come marchio). Ne deriva, dunque, che sarebbe un grave errore giungere a determinarsi nel senso della confondibilità tra due segni in ragione, unicamente, della reputazione del marchio anteriore, non essendo possibile affermare – sulla base di tale eventuale reputazione – che il pubblico di riferimento percepisca uno dei componenti del marchio anteriore come dominante rispetto a qualsivoglia altro elemento di cui si componga il marchio medesimo.

 

La decisione in commento fornisce senz’altro un importante strumento interpretativo per comprendere il ruolo della reputazione del marchio ai fini del giudizio di confondibilità tra segni. In particolare, risulta particolarmente interessante notare come la CGUE abbia operato un corretto ridimensionamento del fattore della reputazione, il quale deve senz’altro essere tenuto in debita considerazione da parte del Giudicante ma – al contempo – deve anche essere utilizzato quale parametro guida del giudizio di confondibilità tra marchi e non, invece, quale mero escamotage al servizio degli opponenti e volto a semplificare la valutazione globale dei segni in conflitto.

 

 

MORE

17
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Ripple Files a New Trademark for a Potential Payment Service:

 

  1. Secondhand Clothing Sales Are Booming, Will That Help Solve Fashion’s Sustainability Crisis?:

 

  1. Nike v. Warren Lotas: A Running Timeline of the Case Over One of Nike’s Most “Iconic” Sneakers:

https://www.thefashionlaw.com/nike-v-warren-lotas-a-running-timeline-of-the-case-over-one-of-nikes-most-iconic-sneakers/;   

 

  1. Amid Marc Jacobs Suit, Nirvana is Suing the Art Director Who Claims He Created the Band’s Smiley Face:

 

  1. [Guest Post] 'Grand rights' of great importance: copyright on the big stage:

 

  1. Instagram Opposes Thriftagram Trademark Application:

 

  1. Ripple Forced To Rebrand PayID Trademark After Copyright Infringement Lawsuit:

 

  1. Drone Company Sues For Trademark Infringement Over Hoverfly Mark:

 

  1. China embraces a pharmaceutical patent linkage system:

 

  1. Companies Turn to Design Patents to Fight Overseas Knockoffs:

 

MORE

10
11
20

La CGUE esclude la decadenza per non uso del marchio “Testarossa” (Ferrari S.p.A. contro DU - C-720/18 e C-721/18)

di Giulia Pezzera

 

Con la sentenza del 22 ottobre 2020 la Corte di Giustizia dell’Unione si è pronunciata sul tema della decadenza per non uso del marchio registrato, la cui disciplina è prevista – tra gli altri – dall’art. 12 par. 1 della direttiva 2008/95, il quale prevede che un marchio è suscettibile di decadenza qualora, entro un periodo ininterrotto di cinque anni, non abbia formato oggetto di uso effettivo nello Stato membro interessato per i prodotti o servizi per i quali è stato registrato e se non sussistono motivi legittimi per il suo mancato uso. Inoltre, l’art. 13 della medesima direttiva prevede che, se i motivi della decadenza sussistono solo per una parte dei prodotti o servizi per i quali il marchio di impresa è stato registrato, la decadenza riguarderà solo tali prodotti o servizi.

La decisione è frutto di un rinvio pregiudiziale del giudice dell’Oberlandesgericht Düssseldorf (Tribunale superiore del Land, Düsseldorf, Germania) davanti al quale pendeva il giudizio di appello proposto dalla società Ferrari S.p.A., dopo che il Landgericht Düsseldorf (Tribunale del Land) aveva disposto la cancellazione per decadenza del marchio “Testarossa”, ritenendo che il titolare del marchio non ne avesse fatto un uso effettivo, in Germania e in Svizzera, per un periodo ininterrotto di cinque anni.

Il marchio “Testarossa” è oggetto di registrazione internazionale a partire 22 luglio 1987 per i seguenti prodotti, appartenenti alla classe 12 di Nizza: “veicoli, apparecchi di locomozione terrestri, aerei o nautici, in particolare automobili e relativi ricambi”. Per quanto riguarda l’utilizzo di detto marchio, il giudice del rinvio ha individuato essenzialmente tre tipi di utilizzo: i) la commercializzazione, tra il 1984 e il 1991 di un modello di automobile con il nome “Testarossa” (e i successivi modelli 512 TR e F512 M); ii) la vendita di pezzi di ricambio e accessori (nonché l’offerta dei relativi servizi di manutenzione) per le suddette automobili, identificati dal marchio “Testarossa”; iii) la vendita di veicoli di seconda mano recanti il marchio controverso.

Con la prima e la terza questione pregiudiziale, il giudice del rinvio chiede, in sostanza, se ai sensi degli artt. 12 e 13 della direttiva 2008/95 l’utilizzo di un marchio solo per alcuni dei prodotti/servizi rientranti nella/e classe/i di registrazione costituisca un uso effettivo tale da escludere la decadenza per tutti i prodotti/servizi ivi ricompresi o soltanto per quelli oggetto di specifico utilizzo. A tale proposito la CGUE ha ritenuto che, qualora – nell’ambito di una classe – il consumatore non individui diverse sottocategorie, ma ritenga invece che il marchio in questione identifichi in via generale la totalità dei prodotti/servizi facenti parte della classe, l’utilizzo del marchio anche solo per alcuni di essi è in grado di costituire “uso effettivo” per tutti i prodotti/servizi appartenenti alla classe.  

Nel caso di specie, vero è che il marchio “Testarossa” è stato utilizzato per prodotti molto specifici, ossia autoveicoli sportivi di lusso e dal valore molto elevato, nonché per i relativi pezzi di ricambio, tuttavia, secondo la Corte, essi non costituiscono una autonoma sottocategoria della classe di Nizza n. 12 e, dunque, tale circostanza non è sufficiente per concludere che il marchio sia stato effettivamente utilizzato solo per alcuni dei prodotti per i quali è stato registrato. Per la Corte, quindi, l’utilizzo fatto di tale marchio è, in realtà, conforme alla sua funzione essenziale e può considerarsi non meramente simbolico ma, invece, effettivo.

La Corte si è espressa, poi, su alcune altre questioni poste dal giudice del rinvio e, in particolare, relativamente alla portata dell’esaurimento del marchio, previsto dall’art. 7 par. 1 della suddetta direttiva, con riferimento all’effettività dell’utilizzo che si realizzi con la vendita di prodotti di seconda mano. A tale proposito la Corte ha ritenuto che la norma non osti a che l’ulteriore commercializzazione di prodotti già immessi sul mercato costituisca uso effettivo del marchio, affermando che “il fatto che il titolare del marchio non possa vietare a terzi l’uso del suo marchio per prodotti già immessi in commercio con quest’ultimo non significa che non possa farne uso egli stesso per tali prodotti” (p. 59).

Inoltre, è necessario richiamare anche la risoluzione della quarta questione pregiudiziale, utile a chiarire la portata del concetto di uso effettivo del marchio. La Corte di Giustizia ha infatti chiarito, con riferimento ai servizi di manutenzione, che un marchio forma oggetto di uso effettivo quando il suo titolare fornisce servizi connessi ai prodotti commercializzati, a condizione che venga effettivamente utilizzato il marchio interessato al momento della fornitura dei servizi.

Infine, con l’ultima questione pregiudiziale, è stato confermato che l’onere della prova del fatto che un marchio sia stato oggetto di uso effettivo tale da escluderne la decadenza grava in capo al titolare del marchio, essendo quest’ultimo il soggetto più idoneo a fornire prova dei concreti atti di utilizzo.

Con tale pronuncia la Corte ha dunque escluso la decadenza del marchio “Testarossa”, ritenendo che la celebre Ferrari S.p.A., titolare del marchio controverso, ne abbia in realtà fatto un uso effettivo, ai sensi dell’art. 12 par. 1 della direttiva 2008/95.

MORE

09
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. District Court Finds Google Patent Ineligible Under Alice
  1. Off-White is Suing an Ice Cream Chain Over Allegedly Infringing Merch and Store Decor
  1. Emily Ratajkowski Says Instagram Post is Fair Use in “Extortion” Copyright Case
  1. L’Oreal and Drunk Elephant Settle Suit Over “Patent Infringing” Vitamin C Serum
  1. General Court confirms lack of likelihood of confusion between DECATHLON and ATHLON
  1. How to take counterfeiters down (cheaply) during a pandemic
  1. What You Need To Know About Biden And IP
  1. Contraffazione, perché le imprese italiane non riescono a registrare il marchio in Cina
  1. Rice wars: the dispute over Basmati GI
  1. US and Brazil partner to shut down piracy sites
MORE

03
11
20

Sustainable fashion: do “green” trademarks actually communicate CSR commitments or just provide misleading information?

MORE

02
11
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

MORE

27
10
20

BANKSY E LA CANCELLAZIONE DEL MARCHIO FLOWER THROWER PER MALAFEDE

di Livia Allegri

 

Con la recente decisione N. 33843 C, l’Ufficio dell’Unione Europea per la proprietà intellettuale (EUIPO) ha dichiarato nulla per malafede del depositante, ai sensi dell’art. 59 del Regolamento UE n. 1001/2017 sul marchio dell’Unione Europea, la registrazione di marchio n. 12575155, costituito dalla rappresentazione dell’iconica opera “Flower Thrower” dell’artista Banksy.

 

Nel 2019, la Full Colour Black Limited, società che commercializza cartoline e altri gadget riproducenti le opere dell’artista, ha chiesto l’annullamento della poc’anzi citata registrazione, asserendo che il marchio in questione fosse privo di capacità distintiva e, soprattutto, che fosse stato depositato in malafede in quanto, al momento del deposito, il richiedente non avrebbe avuto alcuna intenzione di utilizzarlo in commercio. La Divisione di Cancellazione dell’EUIPO ha ritenuto fondate le argomentazioni sviluppate dalla Full Colour Black Limited, annullando la relativa registrazione. 

 

Nello specifico, l’EUIPO ha ritenuto che, al momento del deposito della domanda di registrazione in esame, Banksy non avesse una reale volontà di utilizzare la propria opera come segno distintivo per identificare prodotti o servizi. Al contempo, l’EUIPO ha verificato che non vi è mai stato un effettivo uso in commercio della rappresentazione dell’opera “Flower Thrower” come marchio, considerato che, come apertamente dichiarato dallo stesso artista, l’apertura del punto vendita a Londra denominato “Gross Domestic Product” ha avuto l’unico scopo di cercare di evitare la decadenza del marchio stesso per non uso.

 

La Divisione di Cancellazione dell’EUIPO ha, pertanto, fondato la propria decisione su una connotazione piuttosto ampia di malafede, di matrice prettamente giurisprudenziale e, da ultimo, ribadita dalla sentenza del 29/01/2020, 371/18 (SKY, EU: C: 2020: 45), in base alla quale la malafede sarebbe ravvisabile ogniqualvolta vi sia un intento sleale del richiedente rispetto ai fini perseguiti dalla normativa europea in materia di marchi.

 

Sulla scorta tanto di tale definizione quanto degli elementi di fatto esaminati, l’EUIPO ha quindi concluso che lo scopo perseguito da Banksy all’atto del deposito della domanda di marchio de qua non fosse conforme alle funzioni proprie di un marchio registrato, ossia l’identificazione e la certezza della provenienza di prodotti e servizi, ed ha – dunque – dichiarato nulla la registrazione di marchio n. 12575155.

 

La decisione dell’EUIPO offre, senz’altro, un interessante spunto di riflessione in merito all’impossibilità di riconoscere protezione alle opere di street art sulla base del diritto d’autore. Gli Esaminatori dell’EUIPO, infatti, esulando dall’ambito proprio del procedimento di cancellazione, hanno precisato che, a loro avviso, le opere di street art, eseguite senza il consenso del proprietario del bene su cui sono realizzate, costituiscono un reato e, in quanto tali, non sono tutelabili dal diritto d’autore. Tale considerazione troverebbe ulteriore conferma, sempre a dire degli Esaminatori, nel fatto che i graffiti sono solitamente collocati in luoghi pubblici, affinché tutti possano vederli e fotografarli, ciò che potrebbe “annullare” qualsiasi diritto d’autore, anche nel caso l’autore dovesse negare tale “annullamento” e volesse rivendicare il proprio diritto d’autore.  

 

MORE

26
10
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Cult Gaia is Still Fighting for a Trademark Registration for the Configuration of its Ark Bag
  1. Piet Mondrian’s Heirs Are Suing a German Museum for the Return of Four Paintings Worth Over $200 Million
  1. As a Lawsuit Over the Nazi-Looted Guelph Treasure Goes to the Supreme Court, Congressional Leaders Blast Germany’s Attempt to Quash It
  1. European Data Protection Board - 40th Plenary session: Guidelines on Data Protection by Design & Default, Coordinated Enforcement Framework, Letter on Copyright Directive
  1. The EUIPO and INSME sign a collaboration agreement to bring IP to SMEs
  1. EU rejects plan to rename veggie burgers “veggie discs”:
  1. Geographical Indications in the UK post Brexit
  1. In New Injunction Filing, Nike Asks Court to Stop Warren Lotas from “Flooding the Market With Fakes”
  1. Invalidating a patent after expiry of the patent term? German Federal Court of Justice confirms broad standing to sue
  1. Lewis Hamilton company loses TM battle against Swatch
MORE

20
10
20

IL LICENZIATARIO DI UN MARCHIO NON PUÒ SOSTITUIRSI AL TITOLARE NELLA RICHIESTA DI RINNOVO DEL MARCHIO STESSO, SENZA ESPLICITA AUTORIZZAZIONE DA PARTE DEL TITOLARE

di Lorenza Giordani

 

Con la recente sentenza del 23 settembre 2020 (T-557/19), il Tribunale UE ha respinto il ricorso contro la decisione della Commissione di Ricorso dell’EUIPO, la quale aveva rigettato la richiesta avanzata dalla società licenziataria del marchio “” di restitutio in integrum nel diritto di richiedere il rinnovo del predetto marchio dopo la scadenza dello stesso.

Il marchio in oggetto poteva essere rinnovato entro il 22 luglio 2017, oppure – a fronte del pagamento di una sovrattassa – al più tardi entro il 22 gennaio 2018; tuttavia, l’inerzia del titolare ne aveva causato la decadenza.

 

Successivamente, il 21 luglio 2018, la licenziataria del marchio in questione depositava una richiesta di restitutio in integrum ai sensi dell’art. 104 del Regolamento UE 2017/1001 sul marchio dell’Unione Europea. L’Ufficio prima, e la Commissione di Ricorso poi, respingevano la richiesta della licenziataria, non avendo la stessa dato prova di aver tenuto tutta la diligenza dovuta nelle circostanze.

 

La licenziataria, infine, impugnava la decisione della Commissione di Ricorso dinanzi al Tribunale di Primo grado della Corte di Giustizia UE, il quale osservava che la licenziataria non può essere giuridicamente assimilata alla titolare del marchio ai fini del rinnovo della registrazione del marchio stesso, ma “al contrario, al pari di qualunque altro soggetto, essa deve essere esplicitamente autorizzata dalla titolare del marchio in questione, perché possa presentare una domanda di rinnovo, e deve fornire la prova dell’esistenza di una tale autorizzazione”.

 

Secondo quanto stabilito dal Tribunale, la suddetta interpretazione è conforme al principio di effettività e alla conseguente esigenza di certezza del diritto, in quanto garantisce il rigoroso rispetto dei termini previsti dagli artt. 53 e 104 del Regolamento 2017/1001 in tema di rinnovo di un marchio in scadenza. Difatti, il titolare di un marchio che non abbia provveduto al rinnovo non può autorizzare un soggetto terzo a presentare istanza di rinnovo – peraltro, fuori termine – nel tentativo di eludere la disciplina a ciò dettata. Parimenti, un licenziatario non può chiedere di essere reintegrato nei termini per il solo motivo che il titolare del marchio ha lasciato decadere i propri diritti su tale marchio né, tantomeno, può essere ammesso a sovvertire la volontà del titolare che abbia deciso consapevolmente di non rinnovare il proprio marchio.

 

Quanto sopra in considerazione del fatto che, come ha osservato il Tribunale, l’obiettivo perseguito dal Regolamento 2017/1001 consiste “nel garantire l’identità d’origine del prodotto o del servizio contrassegnato dal marchio e non nel garantire sine die la registrazione di un marchio dell’Unione Europea che sia scaduta per omesso rinnovo”.

 

Infatti, un marchio che arrivi a scadenza senza che la sua registrazione venga rinnovata torna ad appartenere al pubblico, con la conseguenza che altri potranno depositarlo e registrarlo, così traendone efficacemente tutte le utilità economiche, in un’ottica di promozione della concorrenza e del progresso.

MORE

19
10
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Il Sottosegretario Alessia Morani presidierà il Consiglio Nazionale per la lotta alla contraffazione e all’Italian sounding

 

  1. USPTO published the report titled: “Public views on AI and IP policy”. Industry opinions about AI inventions.

 

 

  1. Daren Tang Assumes Functions as WIPO Director General

 

 

  1. Italian anticounterfeiting week

 

  1. CJEU rules that a functional shape may be protected by copyright in so far as it is original

 

  1. eBay expands authenticity service to combat fakes

 

  1. EU legislation harmonising the mandatory indication of the country of origin of food does not preclude the adoption of national measures imposing certain additional particulars regarding origin or provenance
MORE

12
10
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. CJEU says that the assessment of distinctiveness of signs that are to be applied to specific goods used to deliver a service should not also entail an assessment of norms and/or customs of the relevant sector

 

  1. The Casebook of Copyright: are the character traits of Sherlock Holmes protected by intellectual property?

 

  1. Hamburg Commissioner Fines H&M 35.3 Million Euro for Data Protection Violations in Service Centre

 

  1. What Armor on WWII Planes, Honeybees and the Medici Tell Us About Innovation Strategy
  • https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/10/11/armor-wwii-planes-honeybees-medici-tell-us-innovation-strategy/id=126079/

 

  1. Google will have to pay publishers: France sets a European “precedent” (in Italian)

 

  1. Hermès Prevails in Unfair Competition Case Over “Make Your Own Birkin” Classes
  •  https://www.thefashionlaw.com/hermes-prevails-in-case-over-make-your-own-birkin-class/

 

  1. Glenn Gould: Inventor of “User Rights”?
  • https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/10/glenn-gould-inventor-of-user-rights.html

 

  1. Plagiarism case over Led Zeppelin's Stairway to Heaven finally ends

 

  1. An Instagram Feud Over a Buzzy Diet Has Resulted in a Hard-Hitting New Lawsuit

 

  1. Champagne, Champeng, and oronyms: Pushing the boundaries of bad faith jurisprudence?
  •  https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/10/champagne-champeng-and-oronyms-pushing.html
MORE

07
10
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. California Court’s Finding of Fair Use for Nicki Minaj Affirms Public Benefit of Artistic Experimentation: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/09/29/california-courts-finding-fair-use-nicki-minaj-affirms-public-benefit-artistic-experimentation/id=125646/;
  2. Robot wars - Ocado sued by AutoStore over patent infringement: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-autostore-ocado-lawsuit/robot-wars-britains-ocado-sued-by-autostore-over-patent-infringement-idUSKBN26M6HF;
  3. Nuova legge in Qatar per la protezione della lingua araba: l'utilizzo del marchio su insegne e pubblicità locali: https://www.glp.eu/it/update/news/?id=314;
  4. Is “taking all reasonable precautions”, or “otherwise acting innocently”, a defence to possessing counterfeit goods? https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/10/is-taking-all-reasonable-precautions-or.html;
  5. India and S.Africa ask WTO to waive rules to aid COVID-19 drug production: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/healthcare/biotech/pharmaceuticals/india-and-s-africa-ask-wto-to-waive-rules-to-aid-covid-19-drug-production/articleshow/78476646.cms;
  6. NEW GUIDELINES FOR EXAMINATION BIOTECH IN BRAZIL ARE PENDING: https://blog.ficpi.org/new-guidelines-for-examination-biotech-in-brazil-are-pending/;
  7. When you are a lawyer, what is confidential about a confidential settlement? https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/10/when-you-are-lawyer-what-is.html;
MORE

02
10
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Huawei Sued For Infringing Network Congestion Management Patent:

 

  1. Japan leads battery tech race with third of patent filings:

 

  1. To ethically tackle COVID-19, Big Pharma needs an overhaul:

 

  1. Modernising pharma patents: can AI be an inventor?:

 

  1. Marc Jacobs Wants to Block Nirvana LLC from Registering Smiley Face Trademark:

 

  1. Neiman Marcus v. Marble Ridge Capital: The Story Behind the $1 Billion-Plus Legal Battle | The Fashion Law:

 

  1. Amazon Sued for Trademark Infringement:

 

  1. Banksy’s Attempt to Trademark a Graffiti Image Is Thrown Out:

 

  1. Two Decades, a Bitter Legal Battle, and More than $1 Billion Later, LVMH's La Samaritaine is (Almost) Ready for its Debut | The Fashion Law:

 

  1. Louis Vuitton Is Korea's Most In-Demand Counterfeit Brand:

 

MORE

« 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »