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NEWS

21
09
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. CJEU confirms no likelihood of confusion between MASSI and MESSI

 

  1. A Valentino by any other name

 

  1. Nine years after Premier League v. Murphy, Austrian Supreme Court revisits football screening in pubs

 

  1. Off-White is Still Fighting for a Trademark Registration for “Product Bag”

 

  1. In the Fight Against Modified Luxury Goods, Vortic’s Win in Hamilton Watch Case is Telling

 

  1. Guangzhou IP court affirms Mitsubishi infringement ruling

 

  1. Eli Lilly’s patent win in France a ‘game changer’

 

  1. Apple’s diverse emojis infringe copyright, claims suit

 

  1. Major publishers secure injunction against e-book sellers

 

  1. The European Commission's IP Booster: Next Deadline 30 October 2020
MORE

15
09
20

Customs enforcement of intellectual property rights / “EORI” number now required!

In the European Union, Customs enforcement of intellectual property rights is currently governed by Regulation (EU) No. 608/2013; in accordance with its provisions, when Customs Authorities suspect that goods under their supervision infringe intellectual property rights, they may suspend the release of or detain the goods, whether at their own initiative or upon application.

 

On 21 August, Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 2020/1209 was published, amending the previous Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 1352/2013, and therefore partially modifying the forms required for the filing before Customs Authorities of any Application for Action or Renewal pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 608/2013(https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/reg_impl/2020/1209/oj). The new EU Regulation entered into force on 10 September 2020 and it applies as of today, 15 September.

 

The new provisions take into account the introduction of the EU Customs Trader Portal for the electronic submission of the forms, providing for the Economic Operators Registration and Identification("EORI") number to be included in a mandatory field in the box for both the applicant and the representative in the updated forms.

As a consequence, starting on 15 September, all Applications for Action or Renewal filed before Customs Authorities shall include the appropriate EORI numbers.

 

Do not hesitate to get in contact with us for any further information on the subject!

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14
09
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

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10
09
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. 37th EDPB Plenary
  1. AfrIPI endorses Intellectual Property cooperation plan in Africa
  1. GII 2020 highlights impact of COVID-19 on innovation
  1. Royal family successfully opposes butler TM application
  1. Nike triumphs over Puma in ‘Footware’ TM dispute
  • https://www.worldipreview.com/news/nike-triumphs-over-puma-in-footware-tm-dispute-20157
  1. CJEU win for non-EU musicians in Irish royalty rumble
  1. Pokémon Go App Creator Sued for Patent Infringement
  1. Champagne brand toasts victory over ‘Delaunay’ TM at UKIPO
  1.  ‘Jersey Boys’ Makers Defeat Copyright Claims at Ninth Circuit
  • https://news.bloomberglaw.com/ip-law/jersey-boys-makers-defeat-copyright-claims-at-ninth-circuit
  1.  30 Million Pairs Later, Tecnica’s Moon Boot is Not an Indicator of Source, Says EUIPO Board
MORE

26
08
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. When free-riding someone else's brand might be a win-win situation

 

  1. Sports counterfeits spike during pandemic, but hope for rights holders as battle goes online

 

  1. As Young Designers Continue to Call “Copy!”, What Can They Do to Protect Themselves?

 

  1. IP implications of 3D printing, a new study

 

  1. Fumble: How Brands Lose their Fans

 

  1. Never waste an opportunity? COVID-19 and Kodak

 

  1. Apparel Trademarks: How the Mere Ornamentation Technicality May Be Undermining Your Brand

 

  1. Nike is on a Quest to Shut Down Vans’ Checkerboard Trademark Filings

 

  1. WIPO released the (AI) Vienna Classification Assistant

 

  1.  EUIPO Service Charter: second quarter 2020 results available

 

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19
08
20

NEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Jaguar Land Rover loses trade mark battle over Land Rover Defender car series
  1. Untested hypothesis in a clinical trial protocol destroys novelty of a method of treatment claim in Australia (Mylan v Sun Pharma)
  1. New Espacenet: Improved search functionality but reduced accessibility
  1. Ninth Circuit Affirms Dismissal of Copyright Infringement Claim Against Disney’s Inside Out Movie
  1. Appeals Court Sides with Costco in $21 Million Fight Over “Counterfeit” Tiffany Rings
  1. “What Constitutes Infringement?” is the Question at the Center of Latest Chanel v. WGACA Clash
  1. Instagram’s Reels function hit with TM suit
  1. China claims to grant first Covid-19 vaccine patent
  1. Mike Tyson Files Trademark for “Mike Tyson’s Legends Only League”
  1. Fashion Trade Groups Have Joined Together to Fight Fakes on Sites Like Amazon
MORE

05
08
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Magazine Takes Long Shot in ‘Tiger King’ Trademark Tangle: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/ip-law/magazine-takes-long-shot-in-tiger-king-trademark-tangle;
  2. For The Record™ Granted Patent for Blockchain Verified Recordings: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200803005052/en/Record%E2%84%A2-Granted-Patent-Blockchain-Verified-Recordings;
  3. Delhi High Court Directs Blocking Of 50 Rogue Websites Using Snapdeal Trademark: https://inc42.com/buzz/delhi-high-court-directs-blocking-of-50-rogue-websites-using-snapdeal-trademark/;
  4. Hello Kitty hired to spread awareness of new Japanese copyright laws: https://completemusicupdate.com/article/hello-kitty-hired-to-spread-awareness-of-new-japanese-copyright-laws/;
  5. Yeasayer Drop Copyright Lawsuit Against the Weeknd over "Pray for Me": https://exclaim.ca/music/article/yeasayer_drop_copyright_lawsuit_against_the_weeknd_over_pray_for_me;
  6. The Risk of trade secret misappropriation during work-from-home arrangements: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business/1963143/the-risk-of-trade-secret-misappropriation-during-work-from-home-arrangements;
  7. Ex-Google exec sent to prison for stealing robocar secrets: https://nbcmontana.com/news/nation-world/ex-google-exec-sent-to-prison-for-stealing-robocar-secrets;
  8. Apple Investors Unfazed by China Patent Suit: https://www.barrons.com/articles/apple-stock-investors-unfazed-by-china-patent-suit-51596469591;
  9. Protecting Intellectual Property with Data Loss Prevention: https://cio.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/digital-security/protecting-intellectual-property-with-data-loss-prevention/77363711;
  10. Strong Roots: Comparative Analysis of Patent Protection for Plants and Animals: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/08/05/strong-roots-comparative-analysis-patent-protection-animals-plants/id=123649/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Ipwatchdog+%28IPWatchdog.com%29
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23
07
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

 

  1. New York developer who whitewashed 5Pointz graffiti—and owes artists $6.75m in damages—appeals to Supreme Court
  1. 320 tonnes of potentially dangerous dairy products taken off the market in Operation OPSON IX
  1. The world needs a 'people's vaccine' for coronavirus, not a big-pharma monopoly
  1. Misappropriation by Acquisition: Are M&A Discussions Setting Companies Up for Complicated Lawsuits?
  1. The UK takes the final step out of Unitary Patent Court
  1. Social media brands ‘exposing’ users to fraud, claims report
  1. PRS for Music off to a Flying start in copyright infringement claim against Qatar Airways
  1. EUIPO: Launch of Strategic Plan 2025 EPO’s Annual Review 2019 published: progress made on strategic plan
  1.  Microsoft may face EU antitrust probe after Slack complaint on tying practice
  1.  A primer on patenting artificial intelligence in Europe

 

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13
07
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

MORE

07
07
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. How Patent Races Impact Innovation: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/07/06/patent-races-impact-innovation/id=123100/;
  2. Lessons on Patent Subject Matter Eligibility from Dropbox v. Synchronoss: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/07/02/lessons-patent-subject-matter-eligibility-dropbox-v-synchronoss/id=123009/;
  3. INSIGHT: Space Force and Netflix—A Lesson in Securing IP Rights: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/us-law-week/insight-space-force-and-netflix-a-lesson-in-securing-ip-rights;
  4. Vaseline, Smirnoff risk removal from trademark registry: https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/business/Vaseline-Smirnoff-risk-removal-from-trademark-registry/2560-5589140-89n8to/index.html;
  5. Conan Doyle Estate Sues Netflix Over Coming Movie About Sherlock Holmes' Sister: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/conan-doyle-estate-sues-netflix-coming-movie-sherlock-holmes-sister-1300108;
  6. The CJEU Brompton Bicycle case: a UK view: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/07/the-cjeu-brompton-bicycle-case-uk-view.html;
  7. 'It has been a battle': Montreal artist says her designs were stolen by online companies: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-monday-edition-1.5638941/it-has-been-a-battle-montreal-artist-says-her-designs-were-stolen-by-online-companies-1.5638947;
  8. Kanye West Trademarks ‘#WestDayEver’ For Clothing And Footwear: https://etcanada.com/news/664967/kanye-west-trademarks-westdayever-for-clothing-and-footwear/;
  9. China: PCT Applications Can Directly Enter The Italian National Phase: https://www.mondaq.com/china/trademark/962422/pct-applications-can-directly-enter-the-italian-national-phase;
  10. Indivisibility and visibility in invalidity proceedings of a Community design: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2020/07/indivisibility-and-visibility-in.html;
  11. Supreme Court sides with booking.com – generic.com trademarks not necessarily generic: https://www.intellectualpropertylawblog.com/archives/booking-generic-com-trademarks
MORE

29
06
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. These boots are made for walking...and not for copyright protection
  1. Latest information on Brexit
  1. European Cooperation: New Trade Mark Law in Cyprus
  1. EPO lifts conventionally bred patent ‘moratorium’
  1. When the consumer getting the mark all wrong might be good for the brand holder
  1. Stan Lee's daughter sanctioned over ‘meritless’ complaint
  1. Publishers May Not be Able to Embed Instagram Users’ Imagery Without Running Afoul of Copyright Law, Per SDNY
  1. EPO’s Annual Review 2019 published: progress made on strategic plan
  1.  Rebranding a City: Milton Glaser and the Ubiquitous “I Love New York” Logo
  1.  Another Spanish painting ruined by amateur restorer prompts call for regulation
MORE

22
06
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. General Court annuls EUIPO Board of Appeal decision on invalidity of Louis Vuitton chequerboard pattern

 

  1. Italian Supreme Court rules that technical regulation (drafted by an IP lawyer) may be *in principle* protected by copyright

 

  1. Finding a Way Forward: Analyzing Approaches to Artificial Intelligence Inventorship

 

  1. UK: Keep Calm And Carry Your Brand Through The COVID-19 Crisis

 

  1. Amazon, Valentino Team Up & File Suit Against Amazon Seller for Counterfeiting, Patent Infringement

 

  1. Tom Petty estate issues cease and desist over Trump's use of song

 

  1. Instagram: copyright free-for-all?

 

  1. CJEU cancels ‘descriptive’ Russian ice cream mark

 

  1. Tinder and Bumble settle dating app dispute

 

  1. Saudi Arabia announces piracy crackdown amid WTO scrutiny
MORE

18
06
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Vogue Owner Settles Suit Over “Black Vogue,” Forcing Designer to Permanently Abandon the Mark

 

  1.  What Does a Case Over the Protectability of a Bike Design Have to Do With the Fashion Industry?

 

  1. US Copyright Office Review Board allows registration of Abercrombie & Fitch’s Store Front Sculpture

 

  1.  Live updates: IP offices implement measures in wake of coronavirus crisis

 

  1.  Whoever invents a coronavirus vaccine will control the patent – and, importantly, who gets to use it

 

  1. The Freewheeling, Copyright-Infringing World of Custom-Printed Tees

 

  1.  Amazon's IP Win Shields Customers From Follow-Up Suits

 

  1.  Zoom says free users will get end-to-end encryption after all
MORE

15
06
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. Twitch Is Cracking Down on DJs:

 

  1. Apple granted patent for software that would let you take socially distant group selfies:

 

  1. How Pandemics Past and Present, Fuel the Fall of Small Businesses and the Rise of Mega-Corporations:

https://www.thefashionlaw.com/how-pandemics-past-and-present-fuel-the-fall-of-small-businesses-and-the-rise-of-mega-corporations/

 

  1. Tiffany & Co. is Being Sued for Allegedly Infringing Color-Changing Stone Patent By Way of $1 Million Bracelet:

 

  1. WHO covid-19 IP pool launches this week without strong pharma support:

 

  1. Microsoft Files "Xbox Series" Trademark, Sparking Speculation Of Another Xbox:

 

  1. BREAKING: CJEU rules that a functional shape may be protected by copyright in so far as it is original:

 

  1. Four Ford Grille Designs Show Up In Trademark Filings:

 

  1. This week Apple won 6 Design Patents for Product Retainers, filed for the iPhone SE trademark, won a Figurative TM for AirPods+:

 

  1. Chanel is Looking to Expand Upon its Protections for its “Lego” Icon in New Trademark Application:
  • https://www.thefashionlaw.com/chanel-is-looking-to-expand-upon-its-protections-for-its-lego-bag-in-new-trademark-application/.

 

MORE

01
06
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

MORE

26
05
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. A Stylized Word Mark in One Country May Be Too Simple and Common in Another: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/05/23/stylized-word-mark-one-country-may-simple-common-another/id=121845/
  2. Panasonic joins IP Open Access Declaration against COVID-19: https://www.automotiveworld.com/news-releases/panasonic-joins-ip-open-access-declaration-against-covid-19/
  3. Patent Rights and Wrongs in the COVID-19 Pandemic: EU and U.S. Approaches to Compulsory Licensing: https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2020/05/19/patent-rights-wrongs-covid-19-pandemic-eu-u-s-approaches-compulsory-licensing/id=121709/
  4. Manchester United sues Football Manager makers over use of name: https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/may/22/manchester-united-sues-football-manager-makers-over-use-of-name
  5. Copyright Office Says Landmark Piracy Law Needs Fine-Tuning: https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/9388994/copyright-office-says-landmark-piracy-law-needs-fine-tuning
  6. China Releases the “Plan for Further Implementation of the National Intellectual Property Strategy to Accelerate the Construction of an Intellectual Property Power Country by 2020”: https://www.natlawreview.com/article/china-releases-plan-further-implementation-national-intellectual-property-strategy
  7. Closer Collaboration between the EUIPO and EURid to Benefit SMEs: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200525005092/en/Closer-Collaboration-EUIPO-EURid-Benefit-SMEs
  8. INSIGHT: Patent Ruling Begs the Question—What Is a Natural Person? https://news.bloomberglaw.com/tech-and-telecom-law/insight-patent-ruling-begs-the-question-what-is-a-natural-person
  9. India: IPR In Development Of Software Technology And Industry: https://www.mondaq.com/india/patent/940286/ipr-in-development-of-software-technology-and-industry
  10. Piaggio Group wins battle against Chinese copy of Vespa Primavera: https://www.campaignindia.in/article/piaggio-group-wins-battle-against-chinese-copy-of-vespa-primavera/461229
MORE

20
05
20

Wycon S.p.A. contro Kiko S.p.A. – Cass. Civ. 30 aprile 2020 n. 8433

Con sentenza del 30 aprile 2020 la Corte di Cassazione si è pronunciata sul caso Kiko-Wycon, fissando alcuni importanti punti relativi alla tutelabilità del layout di ambienti interni, con particolare riferimento, nel caso di specie, ai punti vendita della catena di negozi appartenenti alla Kiko S.p.A.

 

Protagoniste della presente controversia, sorta nel 2013, sono la Kiko S.p.A. (Kiko) e la Wycon S.p.A. (Wycon), entrambe società operanti nel settore della cosmesi. In particolare, la prima aveva lamentato dinnanzi al Tribunale di Milano la violazione dei diritti esclusivi relativi all’arredamento e all’allestimento (trade dress) dei propri negozi, da parte di Wycon.

 

La decisione di primo grado, così come quella di appello, avevano riconosciuto l’applicabilità della tutela autorale ex art. 2 n. 5 l.a. al design interno dei negozi Kiko, nonché la sussistenza di una fattispecie di concorrenza parassitaria ex art. 2598 comma 3 c.c., con conseguenti pronunce inibitorie e risarcitorie.

 

La recente decisione della Suprema Corte ha il merito di aver confermato e chiarito alcuni aspetti della legge sul diritto d’autore con specifico riferimento alle opere dell’architettura, servendosi a tal fine anche della recente giurisprudenza europea.

 

Tra i punti di maggiore interesse può anzitutto segnalarsi la riconducibilità stessa della fattispecie concreta all’art. 2 n. 10 l.a., inerente alla tutela delle opere dell’architettura. In particolare, la ricorrente ha sostenuto che il progetto di allestimento interno dei negozi non rientrasse nelle opere di natura architettonica, mancando il requisito dell’incorporazione del progetto nell’ambito di uno spazio specificamente individuato e con elementi strutturali fissi. Tuttalpiù, il caso avrebbe potuto essere ricondotto all’ art. 2 n. 10 l.a., che tutela invece le opere del design industriale.

 

A tale proposito, la Corte ha sancito che un progetto o un’opera di arredamento di interni è proteggibile ai sensi dell’art. 5 n. 2 l.a. “a prescindere dal requisito dell’inscindibile incorporazione degli elementi d’arredo con l’immobile”, in virtù dell’ampliamento del concetto di architettura a cui si è assistito negli anni, sposando dunque l’orientamento dottrinale prevalente. Si tratta di un aspetto rilevante, considerando che la pretesa applicabilità da parte della ricorrente (tuttalpiù) dell’art. 2 n. 10 l.a. avrebbe implicato la necessaria sussistenza di un requisito ulteriore ai fini della proteggibilità, ossia quello del “valore artistico”, espressamente previsto per le opere del design.

 

Wycon tuttavia, non solo ha criticato l’inquadramento del caso di specie nell’ambito dell’art. 2 n. 10 l.a., ma ha ritenuto di doversi escludere in toto l’applicabilità stessa del diritto d’autore, sostenendo che il design d’interni potesse essere semmai tutelabile quale marchio tridimensionale, come peraltro riconosciuto anche dalla Corte di Giustizia nel caso Apple (CGUE 10 Luglio 2014, Causa C421/13), richiamato dalla Corte di Cassazione. In effetti, Kiko aveva tentato di registrare il layout dei propri negozi come marchio tridimensionale, vedendo tuttavia rifiutata la propria domanda da parte dell’EUIPO “per carenza della capacità distintiva originaria o acquisita”.

 

La Corte di Cassazione ha affrontato tale tema facendo applicazione della recente giurisprudenza europea, in particolare relativa al caso Cofemel (12 Settembre 2019, Causa C-683/17). La citata decisione si era occupata della tutelabilità ai sensi del diritto d’autore delle opere del design industriale (si trattava, in particolare, di capi d’abbigliamento). La Corte aveva anzitutto confermato la cumulabilità della protezione garantita dalla disciplina sui disegni e modelli e quella derivante dal diritto d’autore, escludendo peraltro che tale ultima protezione potesse dipendere dalla sussistenza o meno di un particolare pregio estetico del prodotto. I giudici Europei avevano anzi richiamato il concetto di “opera” elaborato dalla stessa giurisprudenza europea, riferendosi a tal fine alle sentenze Infopaq e Levola Hengelo (rispettivamente: CGUE 16 Luglio 2009, Causa C-5/08 e CGUE 13 Novembre 2018, Causa C-310/17) affermando dunque che ciò che rileva ai fini dell’applicazione del diritto d’autore è la presenza di due requisiti: il carattere creativo e la precisa identificabilità dell’opera. Laddove tali requisiti siano soddisfatti dovrà ritenersi integrata la nozione di “opera” e, in quanto tale, essa sarà proteggibile tramite applicazione della legge sul diritto d’autore.

 

Vero è, come afferma la Corte di Cassazione nel presente caso, che le opere dell’architettura, così come quelle del design, si distinguono dalle opere di altra natura (quali quelle artistiche o letterarie), trattandosi di cosiddetta “arte applicata”, caratterizzata quindi da aspetti di funzionalità oltre che di mera elaborazione intellettuale, la cui “eccessiva” tutelabilità potrebbe determinare conseguenze lesive per la concorrenza, ma è altrettanto vero che «quando il legislatore ha voluto riservare la tutela autorale soltanto ad una fascia elevata di creatività, in correlazione alla specifica destinazione dell’opera dell’ingegno al mercato, lo ha indicato espressamente, come ad es. ha fatto per le opere del disegno industriale, per le quali l’art. 2 n.10 l.a. richiede sia il ‘carattere creativo’ sia il ‘valore artistico’».

 

Ora, tornando al caso di specie, i requisiti dell’originalità e della precisa identificabilità necessitano di un accertamento di fatto, che non può dunque essere operato dalla Corte di Cassazione. Tuttavia, i due precedenti gradi di giudizio ne hanno confermato la sussistenza. Da un lato, perché l’apporto creativo che caratterizza il progetto realizzato dallo Studio Iosa Ghini, commissionato da Kiko, risulta idoneo ad integrare il requisito previsto dalla normativa autorale, in quanto frutto non di mere scelte funzionali; dall’altro perché, seppur manchi, secondo la ricorrente, “un progetto di arredo definito in tutti i suoi connotati espressivi” (e il diritto d’autore, in effetti, tuteli le specifiche forme espressive e non le idee) i giudici di merito hanno ravvisato nel progetto di un concept-store generale una forma espressiva ben identificabile, destinata ad essere replicabile e adattabile alle diverse esigenze degli stores Kiko.

 

Sintesi delle valutazioni svolte si ritrova nel principio di diritto espresso dalla Corte di Cassazione, secondo cui: «in tema di diritto d'autore, un progetto o un'opera di arredamento di interni, nel quale ricorra una progettazione unitaria, con l'adozione di uno schema in sé definito e visivamente apprezzabile, che riveli una chiara "chiave stilistica", di componenti organizzate e coordinate per rendere l'ambiente funzionale ed armonico, ovvero l'impronta personale dell'autore, è proteggibile quale opera dell'architettura, ai sensi dell'art.5 n. 2 La. («i disegni e le opere dell'architettura»), non rilevando il requisito dell'inscindibile incorporazione degli elementi di arredo con l'immobile o il fatto che gli elementi singoli di arredo che lo costituiscano siano o meno semplici ovvero comuni e già utilizzati nel settore dell'arredamento di interni, purché si tratti di un risultato di combinazione originale, non imposto dalla volontà di dare soluzione ad un problema tecnico-funzionale da parte dell'autore».

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11
05
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. The US Supreme Court makes history during the COVID-19 pandemic by streaming oral arguments for first time as the Justices work remotely. What is the case about? A dispute between the USPTO and Booking.com over a bid by the online reservation company to trademark the name. What is the case about? A dispute between the USPTO and Booking.com over a bid by the online reservation company to trademark the name.

 

  1. Italian Supreme Court applies CJEU Cofemel decision to makeup store layout.

 

  1. AI Programs Are Creating Fashion Designs and Raising Questions About Who (or What) is an Inventor.

 

  1. Patent exceptions in times of Covid-19: an Italian perspective.

 

  1. Chanel, What Goes Around Comes Around are Still Fighting Over the Sale of Chanel Bags, Including Potentially Authentic Ones.

 

  1. Trademark applications will drop during the coronavirus crisis, but globalisation offers hope of a speedy recovery.

 

  1. INTA Bulletin, Taking Action on Fake COVID-19 Products and Other Counterfeits.

 

  1. The Bad Spaniel Gets a Treat: VIP Products LLC v Jack Daniels Properties Inc.

 

  1. Congress Asks Amazon’s Bezos to Testify on Use of Third-Party Seller Data.
MORE

04
05
20

OUR SELECTION OF #IPNEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

  1. The non-systematic relevance of earlier IP rights: from Gömböc to Brompton Bicycle
  1. ‘Welcome’ ruling by CJEU in Royalty Pharma SPC case
  1. A Number of Amazon’s International Sites Are on the U.S. Trade Rep’s Annual IP “Black List”
  1. Canon and Toyota found COVID-19 IP partnership
  1. Trade marks and mobile apps: the PlanetArt v Photobox saga draws to a close (in PlanetArt's favour)
  1. USPTO: no room for artificial inventors
  1. The Hague Patents Court conducts first virtual hearing in patent case
  1. Fendi is the Latest Fashion Brand to be Sued for Allegedly Failing to License its Photos
  1. Spotify accused of stealing ad software trade secrets
  1. SkyKicked: High Court confirms trade mark infringement
MORE

29
04
20

NEWS AND ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

 

  1. COVID-19: further extension of deadlines
  1. Climate crisis drives shift towards sustainable fashion
  1. World IP Day and ‘The Sound of the Future’
  1. Can – and Should – Brands Sue Retailers, Resellers Over Price-Gouged Products During COVID-19?
  1. Twenty-fourth Plenary session: EDPB doubles down on COVID-19 guidance in newly adopted letters
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